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A Tribute To Sizanani – Kruger’s Legendary Lion King

It was a sad day last month when rangers of the Manyeleti Game Reserve, in the greater Kruger National Park, learned of the passing of one of their most magnificent male lions—Sizanani. Christof Schoeman, a guide at Tintswalo Safari Lodge described Sizanani as a ‘True Survivor’ for his amazing ability to somehow come out on…

Neighborhood Watch: The Role of Male Mountain Lions in Structuring Social Behaviors

Editor’s Note: This is the second blog in a pair of blogs about a paper recently published in Science Advances showcasing collaborative research with Drs. Mark Lubell and Michael Levy of UC Davis, and Dr. Anthony Caragiulo of the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History. The paper provided the…

Photography teaches youngsters to “see” the beauty of their Galapagos home

“You’re the Galapagos Photographer. I like your photos. I take photos too.” These were the words from a 7-year-old that helped me understand that through photography, my message about caring for the Galapagos was succeeding in reaching people of all ages. Two years have gone by since this conversation with little Fabio, a conversation I…

The cultural challenge for cities to meet the Paris climate targets

By Paul Owens, Director of the World Cities Culture Forum

Last week states, cities, major NGOs and business leaders gathered in Bonn for COP23 to collaborate on the frameworks and policy solutions that will support countries’ efforts to achieve Paris Climate Agreement targets. The summit cemented world cities’ already ascendant role as leaders of global efforts to address climate change, with mayors setting ambitious targets and working collaboratively with cities around the world.

As cities take on increasing responsibility for helping nations meet their Paris Climate targets, they have an additional unexpected, and until this point largely overlooked, tool at their disposal to enact their sustainability and resilience agenda – their local cultural and creative industries.

How endemic cactus helps restore ecological balance in the Galapagos

To the northeast of Santa Cruz Island within the Galapagos archipelago lies Plaza Sur, a small island made up of 13 hectares of land. It is the home to extraordinary fauna and flora, including the Opuntia echios var. echios species, most commonly known as the cactus (DPNG, 2014) (Jaramillo. et al 2017). The scenario in…

With Good Governance We Can Protect Wildlife and the Wellbeing of Traditional People in Africa

Wildlife hunted for food continues to underpin the diets of primarily rural, market-isolated families primarily in Africa, and wild meat often serves as an important source of income where employment opportunities are few. Where regulation is weak and livestock scarce wildlife are being rapidly depleted by hunters for food, and poor rural families are being deprived of a vital source of protein in their diets. To address this problem, a new 45-million-euro, 5-year initiative—funded by the European Commission and the African, Caribbean, and Pacific Secretariat—seeks to counter the key factors driving the unsustainable hunting of wildlife for food in forests, grasslands and wetlands across Africa and in the forests of Guyana and Papua New Guinea.

The battle for Bristol Bay isn’t over

By David Aplin, interim managing director of WWF’s U.S. Arctic program

Time and time again, the people of Bristol Bay, the State of Alaska, and the United States have said overwhelmingly that the risks associated with development of the Pebble Mine are too great. Bristol Bay’s sustainable ecosystems and all of the values they support should not be compromised. Local business leaders don’t want it. The region’s tribes don’t want it. And more than a million Americans have gone on record demanding that this national treasure be protected.

Can anti-poaching activism save 25 million birds a year?

It’s 3 a.m. and I am running through a dark field with a live, wild quail in my hand. I have just extracted it from a poacher’s net in the Famagusta region of Cyprus, one of the most dangerous places for birds on Earth. A poacher’s patrol car passes nearby. Ahead of me in the dark is one of the masterminds of the Committee Against Bird Slaughter’s (CABS) Cyprus operations, Bostjan. Our odds are pretty good. Bostjan has been evading poachers in Cyprus for six years. He knows how far we need to be from the headlamps of a poachers’ car to remain undetected and, perhaps more importantly, he knows how to calm down angry men. We gain some distance from the patrol car and continue working. By the end of the night, we have found six massive quail nets, and the relentless electronic decoys that draw the migrating birds to their deaths.

Can a gentle giant of Philippine coral reefs be saved from extinction in the wild?

We once lived in a world full of giants – blue whales freely swimming in our oceans and large animals such as elephants roaming our land. Unfortunately, populations of terrestrial and marine megafauna have declined dramatically in recent years. African elephant populations have declined from an estimated 1.3 million to around 600,000. Populations of big…

We Will March for the Ocean!

On Saturday, June 9, 2018 tens of thousands of people will March for the Ocean in Washington D.C. and across the nation and planet to mark the end of World Oceans Day weekend. Why? Because we have no choice! Our public seas, already in crisis, are now at hugely increased risk from the Trump administration…

How Nature Is Nurturing Cities

Harini Nagendra has spent more than a decade studying the growth and functioning of cities in South Asia, supported in part by grants from the National Geographic Society in 2006 and 2011. In her new book, Nature in the City: Bengaluru in the Past, Present, and Future she focuses in on the booming modern city of…

A journey through Earth’s history by canoe part 2: Rivers keep flowing and life goes on

From the beginning of life, rivers experiment, trying new directions and invariably taking the easiest path. Everything follows the line of least resistance, a river, a vein cutting through rock, animals crossing a hillside, people on their way to work. As we go in search of some of the earliest life, passing through layers of…

The surprising diversity of Sunda clouded leopard communication behaviors

Sunda clouded leopards (Neofelis diardi) are part of the Panthera lineage of felids that includes African lions (Panthera leo), tigers (Panthera tigris), and jaguars (Panthera onca). These are among the most charismatic wildlife species, but Sunda clouded leopards are the least understood and studied of this group. Sunda clouded leopards are found in Borneo and…

What’s the cost of a surf-and-turf dinner? 1,795 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

What’s the cost of an average shrimp-and-steak dinner? If it comes from the loss of mangrove forests to aquaculture and agriculture, it’s 1,795 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions. That’s about the same amount of greenhouse gases produced by driving a fuel-efficient car from Los Angeles to New York City. Clearcutting of tropical mangrove forests to…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #114

Every week we receive hundreds of wild bird photographs via our Facebook page. And every week we are truly amazed by the quality of the images that all of the dedicated photographers send through. Here we present what we consider to be the Top 25 images of the week. These are the images that demand…