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Solar Eclipse FAQ with National Geographic Expert Aurora Elmore

National Geographic Society’s Dr. Aurora Elmore, Resident Geologist and Senior Program Officer of Our Changing Planet grants, answers questions about the upcoming solar eclipse.

Viewing the Solar Eclipse—in 1937

By Melissa Sagen “Like a hungry small boy sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner, an astronomer at a total eclipse of the sun is there to get all he can while he has the chance. The boy is determined to stuff himself with as much turkey as possible while it lasts, and the astronomer is eager…

The River Runs Through Us

By Abbie Gascho Landis I stand, dripping, in Alabama’s Paint Rock River, and what looks like a rock in my hand is alive. She is a native freshwater mussel called a snuffbox. Her apricot-sized shell meets in a blunted edge, forming a curving triangle, which is mottled yellowish and dark brown. I have lifted her…

EPA, DOT Reviewing Fuel Economy Standards

In a Federal Register notice, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Transportation announced they were considering rewriting emissions standards for cars and light trucks made between 2022 and 2025. The review covers vehicle model years 2022 to 2025. The EPA is also seeking comments on whether fuel standards for the 2021 model year “are appropriate.” The public…

Ideas Are Like Eggs: Once Hatched, They Have Wings

What started with a 3rd-grade animal report on the ring-tailed lemur has become a complete dedication to the people, plants, and animals of Madagascar. The ideas of a 9-year-old-me are now truly taking flight, as I train a new generation of Harvard students to help protect this unique land.

Gardening the Seas to Save the World’s Corals

By Nexus Media, with Diego Lirman As ocean waters warm and acidify, corals across the globe are disappearing. Desperate to prevent the demise of these vital ecosystems, researchers have developed ways to “garden” corals, buying the oceans some much-needed time. University of Miami Rosenstiel School marine biologist Diego Lirman sat down with Nexus Media to describe the…

I met the tribe on the front line in the battle to save Indonesia’s forests

By Sophie Grig, Survival International campaigner  “We’re proud that we still have the forest,” Temenggung Grip says, standing tall, waving at the vast expanse of trees. “We feel proud to be Orang Rimba, everything we have talked about still exists, people ask about tigers, how big are they, what are they like, and we know…

Romanian bears and wolves: to kill or not to kill, that is the question

By Masha Kalinina, International Trade Policy Specialist, Humane Society International, and Gabriel Paun, Biologist and President of Agent Green Romania

On Monday, footage surfaced in international media of brown bears “besieging” a Romanian village. The clip shows the animals scavenging for food in trash bins, walking through the town, and running past bewildered pedestrians. Unfortunately, images like these can invoke fear among the public and play very well into the hands of those who seek to justify the slaughter of bears (and other carnivores) in Romania.

Remembering Lady Liuwa, the ‘Last Lioness’ of Zambia’s Liuwa Plain

Posted by African Parks A legendary lioness fondly known as ‘Lady Liuwa’, that lived in Liuwa Plain National Park in Zambia, died of natural causes on August 9, 2017, just one day before World Lion Day. African Parks, a conservation NGO which manages national parks and protected areas across Africa, has been managing Liuwa Plain…

Remembering Lady Liuwa

By Rob Reid, African Parks It doesn’t matter how much you know about lions, or what you think you know about them, how many scientific publications you’ve read, nor how much time you’ve spent with them.  They will always surprise you.  None more so than a very beautiful lady that I’ve known for the last three years.…

It’s Japan’s turn to save the African elephant

Japan is one of the largest remaining ivory markets in the world with more ivory manufacturers, retailers and wholesalers than any country. The Japanese government needs to step up to the plate and join the international effort to combat wildlife trafficking by closing its domestic ivory market.

Will the Ocean Ever Run Out of Fish?

By Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet   What’s the deal with overfishing? What’s at stake? And what can we do about it? We teamed up with the good folks at TEDEd on this animated short to explain. Punchline: Wild fish simply can’t reproduce as fast as 8 billion people can eat them. So we…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #100

The Wild Bird Trust presents the hundredth Top 25 Wild Bird Photos! Over the past 100 weeks, 25 000 top class photographs have been showcased from around the world, well done to everyone! Your photographs bring awareness to the amazing diversity of wild birds across the globe. To be considered for next week’s Top 25…

California Dairies Join Forces with Conservationists and an Irrigation Supplier to Save Water and Reduce Groundwater Pollution

For most of us, dairy products like milk, butter, cheese, and yogurt are an integral part of our daily diets. In fact, US residents consume on average more than 600 pounds of dairy products (expressed on a milk-equivalent basis) per year, according to the US Department of Agriculture. Some 9 million dairy cows meet that…

Federal Science Report Finds Human Activity Does Influence Climate Change

A draft report on the science of climate change estimates that it is “extremely likely” that more than half of the rise in temperatures over the past four decades has been caused by human activity. This activity, it estimates, is responsible an increase in global temperatures of 1.1 to 1.3 degrees Fahrenheit from 1951 to 2010. “Many lines of evidence demonstrate…