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Save Our National Monuments

If Ryan Zinke, the secretary of interior, wants to emulate Theodore Roosevelt’s legacy, he should recommend leaving the national monuments as they are.

Proposed Rare Earths Mine Threatens Protected Forest, Lemurs, and Farmers in Madagascar

By Edward Carver The device you are using right now, as you read this story, was likely made with rare earth elements from China. Rare earths are used in computers and cell phones, among many other modern devices, and demand for them continues to rise. But in the last several decades, rare earth mining has…

How Fish Are Like Coffee: the Changes Coming to Your Seafood Plate

Over the past five years, as I’ve built the Fish 2.0 business competition, I’ve seen an overwhelming number of creative ideas bubbling up—with highly qualified entrepreneurial teams behind them. Their innovations, combined with powerful social and environmental forces, are creating a new world both above and below the ocean’s surface. I believe that by 2027,…

Mining and Biodiversity Protection – Efforts at International Governance

Recently, I was asked to contribute a small section on mining and biodiversity to the first global assessment of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES).  This contribution, which would be part of section 2.2.5 of Chapter 6 of the IPBES Global Assessment, is provided below and the full assessment will be published later…

Local resilience succeeding against a global ocean of threats

By Nicanor Requena and Leobihildo Tamai      

Whether you enter tropical seas as a tourist or a researcher, or to ensure your family’s sustenance and sense of place as we do, two divergent trends loom on the horizon. First, our coral reefs provide an astonishingly rich source of biodiversity, protein, jobs and income, and can for generations to come. But second, they face existential threats.

As native Belizeans, we know what’s at stake. Respected marine scientist Dr. John Bruno just delivered the latest diagnosis following his many summers visiting our backyard. Twice-daily surveys showed him irreversible degradation of the western hemisphere’s largest barrier reef. Worldwide, reefs are under siege from sediment, plastic, algae, polluted runoff, hypoxic zones, invasive species, and perhaps most importantly, overfishing. Worse still, a changing global climate has made tropical waters hotter and more acidic, transforming some reefs into bleached and barren coral graveyards.

Interview with National Geographic Society’s Dr. Aurora Elmore

By Reaganne Hansford

It all started with a question: Why? Why, with the state of today’s world, do you still care? This question could be asked to anyone, at any point in our Earth’s history, and the answer would be interesting. So I decided to ask the people who are usually the ones asking this three-letter word, employees of National Geographic, “Why?”

Cuba – Gardens of the Queen: The Last Stand for Caribbean Reef Systems

Safina Center Fellow Shawn Heinrichs documents a special Caribbean diving experience in Cuba.

What the Platypus Can Tell Us About Life on Other Planets

Despite our many differences, we humans and platypuses share an important distinction: not only are we both well adapted to our ecological niches, but we’re both evolutionary singletons, species that have no parallel, no evolutionary doppelgänger, either today or in the past. Why that is so is a mystery. If big brains, bipedality, and opposable thumbs are so useful, why didn’t natural selection lead to the evolution of human-like creatures multiple times? As for the platypus, streams like the ones they live in occur throughout the world, yet the duckbill is singular.

Planting a New Shoreline: The Importance of Field Trips in Northwest Florida

It was already hot by the time mid-morning rolled around the Florida Panhandle. Light sparkled off the surface of Joe’s Bayou, reflecting a bright blue sky clear of clouds. My co-workers and I waited at the edge of the water, 12 plastic tubs of soil sitting next to us. It was time to plant a…

1Frame4Nature | Goldilocks, the Sheep and the Predator

Post by iLCP Fellow and French conservation photographer Denis Palanque.  What YOU Can Do:  Take the time to meet people and discuss with them. Expose your points of view and arguments with passion and conviction. Make your voice heard. Learn about your local habitats and wildlife conflict. No cause is lost. Everyone can change their minds. Write…

Tragic Murder of Prominent Conservationist a Grave Blow to Defense of the Living Planet

Wayne Lotter’s life mission was to protect elephants and dismantle the illegal ivory market. He had known for some time that he was a target. Wealthy people in high places that had benefitted for decades from the poaching of illegal wildlife in Tanzania were very angry. Despite the danger, he bravely chose to continue to fight ‘the war’ as he always called it. He was tragically murdered this week in a ‘hit’ that police are investigating. 

Monitoring macroinvertebrates on the Galapagos ‘Enchanted Islands’

My experience with the ecological monitoring 2017

By Camila Arnés Urgellés

It was 5:30am when the motor of the Queen Mabel ship was turned off after navigating all night towards Punta Moreno, our first stop in the west of the archipelago. The sun still wasn’t out and we were getting ready for our first dive of the day. A cold breeze swept against us as we propelled ourselves by Zodiac toward the first dive site, but I was more overcome by the excitement of knowing that soon I would be below the water, immersed by this enchanted place. “Ready, one, two, three…” was our signal to enter the water at the same time. While I descended, I could see a garden of corals, algae, fish, turtles and stars of thousands of colors. Having only started my volunteer program at the Charles Darwin Foundation less than three months ago, I could not believe that this was going to be my work-site for a week…

Expanding science and knowledge on the largest island of the Galapagos

I have been very lucky to visit Galapagos numerous times, first as a volunteer at the Galapagos National Park Directorate (GNPD) and then at the Charles Darwin Foundation (CDF). At the start of 2016 I returned to support the Foundation’s work as a “Local Liaison Coordinator” on Isabela, the largest island in the Galapagos. I liked the idea of coming back and helping the Foundation, which has a long history of scientific advice for the management of the conservation of the Galapagos Islands.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #101

The Wild Bird Trust presents this week’s Top 25 Wild Bird Photos! This week we have a range of species from the bright and colourful passerines to the owls. This is just a small insight into the amazing diversity of bird species across the globe. Thank you to all those who submitted, for sharing your…

Solar Eclipse FAQ with National Geographic Expert Aurora Elmore

National Geographic Society’s Dr. Aurora Elmore, Resident Geologist and Senior Program Officer of Our Changing Planet grants, answers questions about the upcoming solar eclipse.