Menu

Where There’s a Bear, There’s a Big Cat

By Liu Mingyu, PhD Student, Peking University One morning last July, I woke just outside the Zhaxilawu monastery to the sound of howling dogs. The monastery lies in China’s Qinghai province, where Panthera, the Snow Leopard Trust, and Shan Shui have partnered to research and protect snow leopards and their landscapes. In addition to working…

National Geographic Photo Ark Spotlight: Ocelot

Listed as an Endangered Species by the United States, the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) numbers fewer than a hundred individuals north of the Rio Grande (in small pockets of southern Texas and Southern Arizona) — and it is likely to be even more disturbed and threatened by an enhanced border wall with Mexico.

Tiger Cubs: A Sign of Hope in Thailand

By Chris Hallam MSc Monitoring Advisor Every success in the conservation world is worth celebrating—no matter what species, location or size of impact. But some feel more significant than others… and the recent news out of Thailand is a perfect example. In Thailand, Panthera has partnered with the Thai Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant…

Bhutan: Ecological Heart of the Eastern Himalaya

For a region as rich in biodiversity as the Eastern Himalaya, Bhutan’s healthy population of wild cats, including snow leopard in the north and tiger elsewhere, can serve to repopulate adjoining landscapes as long as the habitats are protected. Bhutan can function as the ecological heart of the Eastern Himalaya, sustaining rural people as well as unique species of wild cats in this large mountainous landscape. For these reasons, investing in Bhutan’s conservation efforts is beneficial to the world!

Fishing Cats Quietly Slink Out of Existence in Southeast Asia

After extensive camera trap surveys in key habitat failed to reveal a single fishing cat in Java, conservationists fear that the unique water-loving feline may be on the verge of extinction in Indonesia, if not already extirpated there. “If the fishing cat is gone from Indonesia, it is following the extinction of the Bali Tiger…

Big Cats on Camera

Volunteer crews with Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation have captured mountain lions, ocelots and bobcats on camera traps, and found sign of lynx and snow leopard.

National Geographic Photo Ark Spotlight: Lynx

All four species of lynx have been photographed for the National Geographic Photo Ark project, where they act as ambassadors for an extraordinary medium-size wild cat found across much of the Northern Hemisphere, where they all prey primarily on rabbits. They share more than a preference for rabbit; all of them are challenged by habitat-loss due to human development and climate change.

Big Love for Small Cats

Every cat, big and small, should be valued and protected. We strive for a world where all domestic cats have a safe community in which to live, including those whose homes are outdoors.

TNR Is Dangerous Both to Cats and to Other Animals

People who consider themselves “cat lovers,” including proponents of trap-neuter-release (TNR) —programs that sterilize but then abandon domestic cats and so should more aptly be called “trap-neuter-abandon”—don’t mean to consign cats to ghastly fates, but in leaving them outside to fend for themselves, they do.

Will Africa’s Big Five become extinct in the wild?

On World Wildlife Day 2017, a reflection and celebration in photography from the National Geographic Photo Ark of Africa’s Big Five: Lion, leopard, elephant, rhinoceros, and buffalo. A century ago these species were among the millions of wild animals roaming Africa. But now their numbers are dwindling, leaving us to wonder if a hundred years from now they will be extinct in the wild.

Say Cheese! Using camera traps to detect Madagascar’s largest carnivore, the fosa

Post created by Samuel Merson Camera traps have become an important tool for biologists and conservationists alike.  They are regularly used in surveying, and are of particular use in detecting rare and elusive animals. Meet the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox), Madagascar’s largest native predator and a particularly challenging animal to study. Fosa occupy large areas of forest…

Big Cat Week Spirit Comes to a Big Apple School

Happy Big Cat Week! In the spirit of celebration, Explorers-in-Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert just paid a special visit to students at P.S. 205 the Fiorello Laguardia School, a National Geographic Big Cats Initiative Sister School in the Bronx.

KopeLion: protecting wild lions for future generations

Post submitted by Rose Hinson and James MacCarthy While out exploring the Ngorongoro Conservation Area in Tanzania, Ingela and Stuart came across something quite extraordinary. They found all the signs of a lion kill, but the body was missing. Instead of a carcass, all they found was a trail of blood leading off into the…

Asia’s Last Cheetahs

The cheetah’s speed is legendary. As possibly the swiftest mammal that has ever lived (extinct relatives of the cheetah were likely not as speedy), there is nothing on earth it cannot out-run. Nothing in nature, that is. Unfortunately, for all its extraordinary high-speed adaptations, the cheetah has no evolutionary solution for modern traffic. Among the many dangers faced by cheetahs, collisions with vehicles rank among the top threats to an especially endangered population: the unique Asiatic cheetahs of Iran.

Where Have Zimbabwe’s Cheetahs Gone?

Post submitted by Alex Rudee Esther van der Meer looks right at home amid all the five-star luxuries of the Victoria Falls Hotel. As she relaxes in a wicker chair on the red-brick porch of the famous resort, Esther seems for all the world like just another high-end tourist soaking up the African sun. Donning…