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Slow Conservation and Slow Journalism Converge in the Pamirs of Central Asia

It’s 5 p.m., and the sun’s last rays cast a golden glow on an empty road in the eastern Pamirs of Tajikistan. This route was once the Silk Road plied by merchants, nomads, and pilgrims and later by British and Russian soldiers and agents engaged in the territorial contest between Britain and Russia known as…

Climate Change Survival: Choose Your Own Adventure

We are at a point today where every decision we make counts in deciding what America’s climate change story will be–including the fundamental decision of how we tell climate change stories.

Preserving and Deciphering Ancient Rock Art in Texas

Ingenious research has revealed the hidden meaning in paintings more than 4,000 years old.

Origins of a Mysterious Arachnid Revealed

Reconstructing schizomid history in Micronesia led us to tackle the most fundamental questions about these animals, namely, what are they, where did they come from, and when did they arise?

Whale of a tale: How a Mexican fishing village found ownership of its cetaceans

National Geographic Explorer Katherina Audley of the Whales of Guerrero Research Project continues her report of how the folk of Barra de Potosí, a tiny fishing village located in Southwest Pacific Mexico, discovered and became entranced with the whales and dolphins off their coast. She explains the techniques she and her colleagues used to hook the interest of the children, then the wider community, and how the village started developing a pride of ownership of the marine mammals. 

The Meaning and Mystery of Lascaux, 77 Years After Its Discovery

In a moment of wonder and elation 77 years ago today, four French teenagers discovered more than just their missing dog.

Renewed Excavations in the Rising Star Cave

More remains of Homo naledi and evidence about how the bones may have entered the cave may be on the way.

Maintaining Nature’s Delicate Balance in Madagascar

The people I meet in Marofototra have adapted with ingenuity to nature’s changes: the turning of the seasons; changes in fish catch or rice harvest. But we live in a world of increasing human population, deforestation, fisheries exploitation, and, looming behind it all, climate change. These are changes caused by humans, and changes that threaten those with the most fragile dependence on nature’s delicate balance.

Back To School In The Garden, A Digital Lesson Guide For Educators

“I have a question,” Iliana said raising her hand and beckoning me over to her seat just before class ended. “Maybe you won’t be able to answer this,” she paused. “Well I’ll try, what’s up?” “So all this stuff with this environment and climate, is it irreversible?” Words piled up in my mouth, not sure…

NASA Goes Native! A Tribal Spin on the Solar Eclipse

A crowd of more than 400 cheered the students launching weather balloons and their special cargo—including a medicine wheel, carved wooden instruments, feathers, whistles, and a small paddle.

The Beauty and Lessons of a Cloud-Covered Total Eclipse

Many people treat failure as a negative variable best managed, mitigated, or outright avoided. Instead, failure is the dark matter of scientific knowledge—unseen but holding the universe together.

Imagining a Future Without Wildlife in Madagascar

It is difficult to reconcile the need for food with the long-term need for wildlife conservation. It is clear that hunting at current rates drives certain wildlife species’ populations down to unsustainable sizes. Habitat destruction and fragmentation add to the problem. Not only is this harmful in terms of destabilizing food security, it also creates a cascade of harmful environmental impacts.

Save Our National Monuments

If Ryan Zinke, the secretary of interior, wants to emulate Theodore Roosevelt’s legacy, he should recommend leaving the national monuments as they are.

Viewing the Solar Eclipse—in 1937

By Melissa Sagen “Like a hungry small boy sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner, an astronomer at a total eclipse of the sun is there to get all he can while he has the chance. The boy is determined to stuff himself with as much turkey as possible while it lasts, and the astronomer is eager…

Ideas Are Like Eggs: Once Hatched, They Have Wings

What started with a 3rd-grade animal report on the ring-tailed lemur has become a complete dedication to the people, plants, and animals of Madagascar. The ideas of a 9-year-old-me are now truly taking flight, as I train a new generation of Harvard students to help protect this unique land.