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How Fish Are Like Coffee: the Changes Coming to Your Seafood Plate

Over the past five years, as I’ve built the Fish 2.0 business competition, I’ve seen an overwhelming number of creative ideas bubbling up—with highly qualified entrepreneurial teams behind them. Their innovations, combined with powerful social and environmental forces, are creating a new world both above and below the ocean’s surface. I believe that by 2027,…

Local resilience succeeding against a global ocean of threats

By Nicanor Requena and Leobihildo Tamai      

Whether you enter tropical seas as a tourist or a researcher, or to ensure your family’s sustenance and sense of place as we do, two divergent trends loom on the horizon. First, our coral reefs provide an astonishingly rich source of biodiversity, protein, jobs and income, and can for generations to come. But second, they face existential threats.

As native Belizeans, we know what’s at stake. Respected marine scientist Dr. John Bruno just delivered the latest diagnosis following his many summers visiting our backyard. Twice-daily surveys showed him irreversible degradation of the western hemisphere’s largest barrier reef. Worldwide, reefs are under siege from sediment, plastic, algae, polluted runoff, hypoxic zones, invasive species, and perhaps most importantly, overfishing. Worse still, a changing global climate has made tropical waters hotter and more acidic, transforming some reefs into bleached and barren coral graveyards.

Cuba – Gardens of the Queen: The Last Stand for Caribbean Reef Systems

Safina Center Fellow Shawn Heinrichs documents a special Caribbean diving experience in Cuba.

Will the Ocean Ever Run Out of Fish?

By Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet   What’s the deal with overfishing? What’s at stake? And what can we do about it? We teamed up with the good folks at TEDEd on this animated short to explain. Punchline: Wild fish simply can’t reproduce as fast as 8 billion people can eat them. So we…

An elephant seal enters the world: Capturing a rare and beautiful moment in words and on camera

Wildlife photographer Jodi Frediani captures–in words and on camera–a rare and beautiful moment in nature: the birth of an elephant seal.

Three New Shrimp Species Discovered in Cape Town

In a stunning discovery off the coast of Cape Town, three new species of shrimp have been found by amateur freedivers and scientists scouring the shallow intertidal rock pools and kelp forests near Cape Point. Professor Charles Griffiths, a renowned marine biologist from the University of Cape Town who was involved in identifying the new…

Charles Moore is now a two-time Garbage Patch discoverer (and I can tell you what a Garbage Patch looks like)

Last November, Captain Charles Moore would set off to discover a second “Garbage Patch” in the South Pacific as photojournalist Erica Cirino sailed the first patch in the North Pacific he discovered 20 years ago.

Indonesia Shark Diaries

Reflecting on my last year in Indonesia, and on the diversity of experiences and interactions I have had, illustrates multiple sources of conflict around shark and ray conservation and management. Going forward, we need to accept that designing practical solutions will necessitate some hard choices and trade-offs. I believe that conservationists would benefit from putting aside our pre-existing values and assumptions about the “right” approach and taking time to understand other people’s values and priorities.

Reflections on the March for Science

It’s been three months since the March for Science, when over a million people, in over 600 cities, with almost 300 partner organizations took to the streets to champion science for the common good. It was an incredible day. From the stage at the DC march, I looked out on the crowd – well over…

Carl Safina joins board of nonprofit working to improve lives of captive cetaceans

By Erica Cirino There are many people who believe whales and dolphins do not belong in aquariums and marine parks, and for good reason: When you put a large, highly intelligent animal that naturally travels a hundred or more miles a day into a small concrete tank, the results aren’t pretty. The animals suffer increased mental…

World Heritage coral reefs likely to disappear by 2100 unless CO2 emissions reduce drastically

Last month, UNESCO released the first global scientific assessment of climate change impacts on World Heritage coral reefs. While international media has regularly reported on bleaching at the Great Barrier Reef, we knew that was just the tip of the iceberg. The El Nino and climate-fueled temperature spikes that were wiping out corals in Australia were also causing serious damage to reefs in Costa Rica, Mexico, France, the United States, the Philippines, and the Seychelles. And that is just the beginning of the story.

2017-18 Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytellers Announced

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the National Geographic Society announced today the selection of the 2017-2018 Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellows.

Shark Side of the Moon

  The behavior of many animals, including humans, are influenced by the cycle of the moon. For example, many fishes time their reproductive events with the full moon. Together with Chris & Monique Fallows, I have been fortunate enough to study predator-prey interactions between great white sharks and cape fur seals at Seal Island in…

Tackling Tuna: How People Took On the Biggest Tuna Company and Won

By Bunny McDiarmid, Greenpeace International Executive Director

Today is a big day for our oceans. It is good news for sea turtles and sharks, sea birds and tuna. It is also a great day for hundreds of thousands of workers at sea, many of whom have been victims of horrendous working conditions and human rights abuses. Following two years of intense pressure by Greenpeace, environmentalists, labor unions, and human rights organizations, today Thai Union, the world’s largest tuna company, announced a breakthrough package of reforms that marks a new beginning for the seafood industry.

Solar Energy Soon to Surf the Wave of Profitability

Profits for Healthy Oceans Solar, wind, batteries, hydrogen are the four Musketeers of our clean energy future, which will protect our oceans from the effects of global warming. On June 15, the lastest Bloomberg Energy Report concluded that renewable energy will soon be more profitable than coal or oil. The energy transition will soon surf the wave…