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Category archives for Animals

Using Positive Feedback for Training Elephants in Thailand

I have come to realize over the course of my visit that this is an incredibly sensitive complex concern, one that needs a multi-prong strategy, as one solution does not fit all the regional contexts.

Sushi Roulette: Is the Fish You Ordered the One You Got?

Have plans this summer to visit your favorite sushi restaurant? You might order spicy tuna roll. Or maybe salmon or halibut. But is the fish you selected the one you got? If you’re in Los Angeles or many other cities around the globe, it’s a flip of the coin. Scientists at Loyola Marymount University, the…

Trump makes California’s deadliest catch even more deadly: The driftnet fishery for swordfish and shark off our coast

The Driftnet Fishery for Swordfish and Shark Off Our Coast President Trump has just declared war on whales, dolphins and sea turtles in the Pacific. Right now a deadly driftnet fishery targeting swordfish and shark operates off California’s coast with fatal consequences for marine mammals. Unfortunately the Trump Administration has just made it deadlier by reversing…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #92

Here it is, the 92nd edition of the Wild Bird Trust’s “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! All the photographs in this section have been submitted to our Facebook page by talented bird photographers from around the world. Thank you to all of you who have contributed to the selection and for sharing your love…

CPR for Earth: An outstanding conservation success story in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest

Last week, on World Environment Day, the Brazilian authorities added more land to an existing nature reserve to create a protected area four times the size of the original reserve. It’s a huge victory for conservation and particularly for the science of conservation. Explaining why this great news so excites me — and why I am…

Trunks in Tethers

Thailand’s current population of elephants is around 7,000, of which nearly 4,000 are captive beasts of burden. These enslaved animals can never be reintroduced into wild herds. They bear the psychological and physical wounds of neglect, abuse, malnutrition, and seclusion.

1Frame4Nature | A Vessel of Life in the Philippine Seas

Imagine a booming underwater powerhouse, overflowing with vibrant biodiversity; a vast, dynamic wonderland of adaptation in aquatic form. Primordial soup? Not quite–though coral reefs are themselves an irreplaceable vessel of life. From fish nurseries to coastline protection and pharmaceutical breakthroughs to diving meccas, coral reefs provide a multitude of ecological services and economic contributions. Awed by the endless infinity of life living upon life to degrees unimaginable to the naked eye, I count myself lucky to have spent time in these enchanting habitats in many parts of the world.

Food, Fuel, Medicine, Wrinkle Reducer: Algae Does It All

You know what there’s really plenty of in the sea? Algae. And I am in love with them. Most people envision algae as slimy, possibly toxic, green scum. But this diverse group of fast-growing aquatic plants is about to undergo an image makeover, and may soon seem flat-out glamorous. Algae got a lot of excited…

Invasive Alien Species on Islands

Invasive alien species are the major threat to islands by most metrics, and two open access papers published this week highlight this threat in different ways.

VIDEO: Tiny lion cub has a message for the world

A few days ago we were greeted for the first time – most dramatically – by a 3.5 week old lion cub born to Gorongosa National Park’s “Sungue Pride.” Gorongosa’s wildlife is rebounding, lions too. National Geographic’s Big Cat Initiative has been instrumental in this recovery. In 2016 we established Lion Anti-Poaching Patrols and a Rapid-Response Veterinary Unit and since September not a single lion we’ve been monitoring has been caught in a poacher’s snare; This compared to 1/3 lions killed or maimed by snares in prior years. A new record. Keep roaring, baby!

Whale conservation spurs economic revival in Mexican fishing community

Barra de Potosí is a tiny fishing village located in Southwest Pacific Mexico. Tucked between a mangrove and salt flat-lined lagoon and a 12-mile golden sand beach, Barra used to be the fishiest place I knew. When I first arrived 18 years ago, tiny fish would thwack my legs in the surf, every fourth wave revealed the form of a big yellowfin or needlefish, and schools of bottlenose dolphins patrolled the coast daily.

How the Safina Center is helping to save the seas this World Oceans Day (and every day)

The members of the Safina Center crew send out their World Oceans Day messages and discuss what they’re doing to help save the seas.

To Protect Endangered Carnivores, We Must Also Protect Livestock

Post submitted by Matthias Fiechter of Snow Leopard Trust.  A conservation catch 22: Increasing the number wild prey animals is key for healthy snow leopard populations. But it doesn’t solve the problem of livestock predation – on the contrary.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #91

The Wild Bird Trust proudly presents the 91st edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! Thank you to all photographers for contributing your beautiful work and sharing with us the wonders of the avian world. Please continue to submit photographs to the Facebook page where they will be considered for the…

1Frame4Nature | Under the Mangrove Sea

The humble mangrove forest is one of the most biologically important ecosystems that border our oceans. They act as the skin of our coastlines, managing the energy exchange between land and sea; and provide vital ecosystem services such as waste treatment, habitat, food resource, and recreation.

I have been on many research expeditions throughout the Gulf of California, Mexico, where I study these ecosystems and photograph them in action: acting as a nursery for yellow snappers, hosting migratory birds after their long flight, and buffering coastlines against storms.