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Category archives for Space

Viewing the Solar Eclipse—in 1937

By Melissa Sagen “Like a hungry small boy sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner, an astronomer at a total eclipse of the sun is there to get all he can while he has the chance. The boy is determined to stuff himself with as much turkey as possible while it lasts, and the astronomer is eager…

Using machine-learning to scan the sky

By Spencer Johnson If you watch the night sky for a while, you’ll start to notice changes. Meteors streak by, the International Space Station glides over in silence, an airplane blinks overhead. Among these celestial transients, less noticeable but far more powerful objects called blazars flash on and off, in brilliant gamma-ray outbursts and flashes…

Reflections on the March for Science

It’s been three months since the March for Science, when over a million people, in over 600 cities, with almost 300 partner organizations took to the streets to champion science for the common good. It was an incredible day. From the stage at the DC march, I looked out on the crowd – well over…

Holding the Cosmos in Our Hands

“The seed comes from the tree, the tree comes from the seed. It’s like the chicken and the egg. If people want to understand it, they will break the seed apart — they will actually kill it — to see the cells, the chromosomes and the genetics. There is another way to look at this. I plant a seed and a miracle happens — something new is born out of this carbohydrate and protein, a new life is born. This is a miracle, you see? The miracle of life.”

Dreams of the World: Intel/Disney Drone Lightshow with Anil Nanduri, Vice President of Intel’s UAV Segment

Dreams of the World: One Dream a Time. This post is the latest in the series Dreams of the World, which profiles interesting people Kike meets during his travels.   “Bringing change to the world – when technology or a product I work on becomes a necessity or feels ubiquitous, and the journey to getting there is something I always…

At the Jersey Shore, Signs of a Comet, and a Climate Crisis

In a new study, scientists say they have found evidence along the New Jersey coast that an extraterrestrial object hit the earth at the same time a mysterious release of carbon dioxide suddenly warmed the planet, some 55.6 million years ago. The warm period, known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), is often cited as…

Inaugural Governor’s Institutes of Vermont on Astronomy Challenges Students to Make a Positive Impression

The Governor’s Institutes are some of the best educational opportunities for Vermont teenagers in the summer. This year they launched their first Institute on Astronomy in partnership with the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium, the Northeast Kingdom Astronomy Foundation, Lyndon State College, and the Vermont Space Grant Consortium. Their hope was to expose the 25 students who attended to astronomy…

Commitments to Accelerate the Safe Integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the United States

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography.   WASHINGTON, DC – Since President Obama took office in 2009, developments in aviation, sensing, and software technology have powered a revolution in unmanned flight. In…

White House Drone Workshop

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography.   A few days ago Intel’s CEO Brian Krzanich spoke at a drone workshop hosted by The White House Office of Science and Technology Office. Brian…

What Went Through My Head When I Found Out I Won the 2016 TED Prize

People in some of the most dangerous areas on Earth are risking their lives to protect ancient sites. What if we all could lend a hand?

Exploring Toxic Ice Caves in an Active Volcano

National Geographic grantee Eduardo Cartaya and his team descend into a volcano’s toxic ice caves on a mission to protect climbers and learn about microbial life in this eerie, otherworldly environment.

Spotlight on Humanity’s United Side

Desmond Tutu’s welcome to the Hōkūle’a crew shows one smile, one spirit connects people from Hawaii to South Africa and beyond.

Video: That’s No Moon. It’s Aliens. (Maybe.)

Scientists and sci-fi fans alike are wondering whether the unusual dips in brightness of a distant star could be the shadows of alien space structures built more than 1,465 years ago.

Predator Free New Zealand: Conservation Country

New Zealand was one of the last places on earth to be colonised by humans, just over 1000 years ago. Ever since, New Zealand has lived the legacy of these impacts.

March 22, 2015: Understanding Wild Fires, Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail in Winter and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they hitch hike from Tasmania to London, study sleep’s science, count India’s tigers, protect the world’s oceans, hike the length of the Pacific Crest Trail in winter, cook the world, understand forest fires, study the real ingredients of processed foods.