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Whale of a tale: How a Mexican fishing village found ownership of its cetaceans

National Geographic Explorer Katherina Audley of the Whales of Guerrero Research Project continues her report of how the folk of Barra de Potosí, a tiny fishing village located in Southwest Pacific Mexico, discovered and became entranced with the whales and dolphins off their coast. She explains the techniques she and her colleagues used to hook the interest of the children, then the wider community, and how the village started developing a pride of ownership of the marine mammals. 

Under the Full Moon: Tracking Nassau Grouper with Acoustic Telemetry

This blog post was written by Krista Sherman, Research Associate at Shedd Aquarium and Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Exeter. Krista’s research is focused on understanding endangered Nassau grouper populations in The Bahamas. In the winter, under the light of full moon, Nassau grouper, Epinephelus striatus, migrate great distances, often over 300 km, to…

The Meaning and Mystery of Lascaux, 77 Years After Its Discovery

In a moment of wonder and elation 77 years ago today, four French teenagers discovered more than just their missing dog.

Unpacking the untold stories of Cambodia’s indigenous minorities

Changing Indigenous Culture in Cambodia: War, and Now Eight months, 41 days in the field. That involved  7 provinces, 14 buses, 6 cars, 16 days on motorbikes, 2 tuk tuks, 1 river raft, hours of muddy walks, 5 translators, over 20 homestay floors to sleep on, 24 families, 1 MacBook filled with data, 2 digital…

Renewed Excavations in the Rising Star Cave

More remains of Homo naledi and evidence about how the bones may have entered the cave may be on the way.

Maintaining Nature’s Delicate Balance in Madagascar

The people I meet in Marofototra have adapted with ingenuity to nature’s changes: the turning of the seasons; changes in fish catch or rice harvest. But we live in a world of increasing human population, deforestation, fisheries exploitation, and, looming behind it all, climate change. These are changes caused by humans, and changes that threaten those with the most fragile dependence on nature’s delicate balance.

Chainsaws & Tree Huggers in the Land of Fairy Tales

“If you want a confession, I found God and His creation, pure nature, in the old growth forest. And at that moment I decided I had to do everything possible to protect it so my children could see it for real, not just in books and museums.” Radu Vlad, Forest & Regional Project Co-ordinator for WWF’s Danube-Carpathian Programme, cuts an imposing figure, unmistakably a man of the Transylvanian forests he’s been campaigning to protect for over a decade.

Imagining a world without lions

As conservationists we get a little wound up sometimes, thinking about how to save wildlife, their environment and the whole of the natural world. But there are times when I like to take a step back and reflect. Sure, I will be mortified if, in the near future, I awake and look out from our…

The Fish and Wildlife Service must atone for tiger’s death

By Delcianna J. Winders, PETA Foundation’s vice president and deputy general counsel for Captive Animal Law Enforcement Early last week, while I sat at work with my dachshund, Littles, by my side, another dachshund, Journey, found herself in the jaws of an escaped tiger who was roaming the streets of Henry County, Georgia. Journey survived the…

Live-blogging Hurricane Irma

I’m the author of Storm of the Century: The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, published by National Geographic Books, and the IPPY Award-winning For Sale-American Paradise: How Americans Were Sold An Impossible Dream In Florida. I’ve been writing about hurricanes and other topics for National Geographic since 2003. I’ll be updating this blog about Hurricane…

Sustainable Urban Water Systems: A View from the Tap

By Anisha Anantapadmanabhan Manager, Water Infrastructure, Ceres As Hurricane Harvey floodwaters recede, and Houston begins the long, expensive road to recovery, its civil engineers and city planners can learn from other cities that are embracing a sustainable water movement. Engineers, planners and financiers are coming together in many cities across the U.S. under a sustainable…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #104

The Wild Bird Trust presents this week’s Top 25 Wild Bird Photos!  This week we feature birds from India, Pakistan, the USA, South Africa and Italy. Thank you to everyone who shared their snaps with us! To be in the running for next week’s top 25 you can submit photographs on the Facebook page with species, location and…

Hurricanes Increase Attention to Climate Change, Shed Light on Infrastructure Concerns

Hurricane Irma is shaping up to be a potentially catastrophic storm that remains on course to hit Florida by Sunday. Coming immediately after Hurricane Harvey, Irma is increasing attention to the relationship of severe weather events to climate change. Throughout the past few decades, hurricanes in particular have drawn attention to the need to fight climate change,…

Money Makes The World Go ‘Round: Green Banks are a Game Changer

By Lynn Scarlett, co-Chief External Affairs Officer at The Nature Conservancy and former Deputy Secretary of the Interior in the George W. Bush Administration If you’re a homeowner (and even if you aren’t), you’ve probably tuned into a home improvement show. There’s something irresistible in the way the hosts, who are always so personable and…

Back To School In The Garden, A Digital Lesson Guide For Educators

“I have a question,” Iliana said raising her hand and beckoning me over to her seat just before class ended. “Maybe you won’t be able to answer this,” she paused. “Well I’ll try, what’s up?” “So all this stuff with this environment and climate, is it irreversible?” Words piled up in my mouth, not sure…