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Tag archives for renewable energy

Why Kill a Snow Leopard Conservation Ranger? Energy Sprawl and Land-Use Conflict

By Joe Kiesecker, Scientist for Lands Conservation, The Nature Conservancy Note: This is the second article in a series on “energy sprawl,” the conversion of new land for energy production. Read the first installment here. A mysterious and untimely death is not what first comes to mind when I think about wildlife conservation. But the…

Renewables and Grid Reliability Focus of Court Ruling, Report

This week the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit unanimously upheld the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) approval of new performance rules for power plants, rejecting environmentalists’ arguments that the rules discriminate against intermittent energy sources such as wind and solar (subscription). The court said FERC acted in a reasonable way…

The Cost of Everything and the Value of Nothing: Falling Costs Are a Game-Changer

By Lynn Scarlett, Global Managing Director for Public Policy, The Nature Conservancy For the average U.S. consumer, electricity is an unremarkable fact of their existence—when they flip the switch, the light comes on. But behind that simple act is a feat of forecasting, engineering, logistics and timing that is mind-bogglingly complex. At the heart of this process is the mix of generation sources—the different electric power plants…

Appeals Court Pauses Litigation over Clean Power Plan

Last week President Donald Trump’s bid to rescind the Clean Power Plan (CPP), which seeks to regulate emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants, was made easier by a Court of Appeals ruling that put a 26-state lawsuit challenging the plan on hold for 60 days without deciding on the plan’s legality. That decision followed…

Solar Power Works Even When the Sun Doesn’t Shine… Batteries Are a Game-Changer

By Lynn Scarlett, Global Managing Director for Public Policy, The Nature Conservancy Dr. Robert Ballard, the celebrated explorer most famous for discovering the wreckage of the Titanic, lives for the moments when something critical he thinks he knows about the world is shown to be wrong—like the day he and his team went in the…

Obama calls for a chilling on drilling in the Arctic

What President Obama’s decision on oil and gas leases in the Arctic means for life on Earth.

Landmark Carbon Dioxide Concentration Passed; Marks New Climate Era

Climate change has entered a new phase, said the United Nations World Meteorological Organization (WMO) on Monday. The WMO reported that concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) “surged again to new records in 2016,” and it predicted that the annual average for CO2 would remain above 400 parts per million (ppm), 44 percent higher than before…

Smart Time, Smart Place for Smart Energy

By Nels Johnson, Director – North America Energy, The Nature Conservancy One of my strongest childhood memories is the smell of dust and sagebrush on a warm summer morning over four decades ago, delivered in a bouncing, open truck driven through the Badlands of North Dakota. We drove along and across the Little Missouri River…

Malaysia’s Green Energy Path

The Asia-Pacific region will play a pivotal role in realizing the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. In this vein, I am presenting here select excerpts of an annotated interview with one of Malaysia’s leading technology advisors, Prof. G. Lalchand that was conducted by the Institution of Engineers of Malaysia (IEM). Malaysia is often…

New York Joins Handful of Other States with Ambitious Clean Energy Targets

By 2030, half of the energy produced in the state of New York will come from renewables, according to a new policy adopted Monday by the state’s public service commission. The move is expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent from 1990 levels (80 percent by 2050) and to attract billions in clean…

Record Low Arctic Sea Ice Extent Points to Irreversible Changes

Scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) said on Monday that Arctic sea ice cover of 5.607 million square miles on March 24 represented the lowest winter maximum since records began in 1979. That’s 5,000 square miles less than last year’s record low. Contributing to the ice extent loss were record high…

Supreme Court Events Leave Fate of Clean Power Plan Uncertain

The outlook for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan, a rule intended to limit greenhouse gas emissions from the existing fleet of fossil fuel-fired power plants, is the subject of debate after two key Supreme Court events last week. First, on Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court in a 5–4 decision issued a stay,…

Climate Change Science Conflicts and Pluralism: The Subtext at COP21 in Paris

“What we need is an agreement that’s ambitious — because that’s what the scale of the challenge demands. We need an inclusive agreement — because every country has to play its part. And we need an agreement that’s flexible — because different nations have different needs. And if we can come together and get this…

United States, Europe Announce Emissions Reductions Pledges

“Ambitious and achievable” is how the White House described its formal emissions reduction pledge—a cut of 26 to 28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025—to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in preparation for negotiation of a binding climate agreement in Paris in December. Opinion about the aptness of the two adjectives…

McCarthy: States Must Comply with Clean Power Plan

On Tuesday, a lawyer hired by the world’s largest coal mining company told the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power that proposed requirements to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants are reckless, and Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, in an op-ed, said states should ignore them, but U.S. Environmental…