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Charles Moore is now a two-time Garbage Patch discoverer (and I can tell you what a Garbage Patch looks like)

Last November, Captain Charles Moore would set off to discover a second “Garbage Patch” in the South Pacific as photojournalist Erica Cirino sailed the first patch in the North Pacific he discovered 20 years ago.

1Frame4Nature | American Icon in the Alaskan Horizon

These photos come from Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve. And by all means, if you ever have a chance to visit the snowy shores of the Chilkat outside Haines, Alaska, I encourage you to do it, especially after the tourists have left, and the temperature now causes ice crystals to form inside your nostrils. This preserve represents the best of who we are as a country. And I think, with everything going on right now, we can at least agree, that we need to remember the things we’ve done right.

10 Handfuls of India

While working on farms and learning about seed preservation this past year for the Fulbright-National Geographic Storytelling Fellowship, I have really gotten to eat some amazing foods. If my hands weren’t in the soil or toiling with seeds, they were usually grabbing the nearest edible item. People talk about how amazing Indian cuisine is — the thalis, the street foods, the home-cooked meals — and yes, those are all pretty great, but where this creative and intricate cuisine comes from, its ingredients, its flavors, its uncooked beginnings, that’s where the real magic lives. This fertile soil (at least that which is untouched by deforestation, drought, or chemicals) breathes so much beauty into our hands. And I consider myself beyond lucky to have held such raw beauty, however briefly.

The Report Is In: 30 Percent of Shops in Nine Countries Include Endangered Turtleshell Gifts

After a three-month survey across 600 souvenir shops in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Panama, Nicaragua, Cuba, Grenada and Colombia, researchers from 12 conservation organizations discovered that 30 percent of the establishments sold products made from endangered hawksbill sea turtles. Gifts ranged from $1 bracelets and rings to $200 for an intricate comb. Of the…

Misool bluewater shark baitball: A sign of conservation success in Raja Ampat, Indonesia

Photographer, filmmaker and conservationist Shawn Heinrichs documents new biodiversity, a sign of conservation success in Indonesia’s Misool Marine Reserve.

Ross Sea MPA creation means the last pristine place in the ocean is finally protected

The pursuit to establish a marine protected area in Antarctica brought me to the Ross Sea four times. It brought my wife, and eventually my daughter, whom we named after a penguin. – John Weller

Devil rays in distress: Protecting the “mini mantas”

Why devil rays, or “mini mantas,” need our help!

Would You Walk Into a Room With Millions of Bees?

Explorer and National Geographic grantee Chris Bashinelli visited rural Uganda to do a cultural exchange with small-scale farmers. He decided to face his fear of bees by going right into an apiary filled with venomous bees.

Plastic: The big breakup

Co-authored by Erica Cirino My dog Foosa and I step onto the beach, and in the first few steps I find—as usual—something made of plastic. This beach is strewn with everything from fiberglass buoys to crumbling Styrofoam cups to poorly disposed “disposable” lighters to plastic bags (use once, throw away, except that “away” is here).…

National Parks: Celebrating a Sentinel of American Memory

Krista Schlyer writes on the beauty and memory of National Parks. “It isn’t just beauty we see in these places, and in infinite others in the National Park System–it’s memory. Memory of another time, another life, when we lived in seamless connection to the system of nature. Written on this body of Earth is the prose of universal memory. We as humans are but a word of it.”

HOW MILLENNIALS ARE COMING TOGETHER

A few months ago, two researchers from the Harvard Divinity School, Angie Thurston and Casper ter Kuile, asked to interview me for a report they were writing on a range of new organizations that they believed represented a sea change in millennial attitudes toward community, personal transformation, and — to my surprise — religion. The organization that I founded…

Sailing into Starvation Island: 70 years after the end of World War II, Peace Boat visits Guadalcanal

Musicians in shell headdresses welcomed hundreds of disembarking Japanese visitors when Peace Boat docked in Guadalcanal, its final port of call, last month. Guadalcanal receives few tourists and our arrival produced a flurry of new entrepreneurs: hawkers arranged wooden canoe figureheads and bottles of pressed coconut oil on mats spread over the concourse, and an ice-cream…

Cigar Limits and Other Cuban Travel Tips

A friend of mine made the infographic below for Cheapflights.com. I thought the team did a nice job putting together what American travelers need to know to visit the Caribbean country, since President Obama lifted many restrictions last December. There are strict limits on how much liquor and cigars Americans can bring back, and not…

Indonesia’s Indigenous Communities Use Ecotourism To Secure the Rights to their Land

From Chandra Kirana in Bogor, Indonesia. Six Indigenous communities have launched an ecotourism initiative that would show off their ancestral forests in a bid to develop alternate economic models that local government in Indonesia could embrace, moving away from extractive industries such as mining and palm oil plantations. The initiative, called GreenIndonesia, would ultimately help…

The 10 Best Restaurants in Havana

This post is the latest in the series Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About, which profiles marvelous locations, unique life experiences and objects of interest to modern explorers that Kike discovers during my travels. If you are planning a visit to Cuba sometime soon, these are some of my suggestions to enjoy a unique culinary experience in Havana. As I…