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(Some) Birds of the Pantanal

There are a lot of birds in the Pantanal. When I say a lot, I mean there are more bird species at this farm (Pousada Aguapé) than the entirety of my home country New Zealand. Its over 40 degrees centigrade every day and all the sane mammals, including myself, are hiding from the heat. Except for the armadillos who are revelling in it. The birds, however, are loving it and making their presence known. So here are some of the main stars.

These are greater rheas (Rhea americana). It would be nice to still have birds like this in New Zealand.

A pair of greater rheas (Rhea americana) in the Pantanal, Brazil
A pair of greater rheas (Rhea americana) in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a guira cuckoo (Guira guira). It is having café da manhã.

A guira cuckoo (Guira guira) eating breakfast in the Pantanal, Brazil
A guira cuckoo (Guira guira) eating breakfast in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a black-hooded parakeet (Aratinga nenday). Its pretty crap what they have been foraging through.

A black-hooded parakeet (Aratinga nenday) perched on a tree in the Pantanal, Brazil
A black-hooded parakeet (Aratinga nenday) perched on a tree in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus). It is doing its impression of Dr Evil.

A hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) either eating or destroying something in the Pantanal, Brazil
A hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) either eating or destroying something in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a narrow-billed woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes angustirostris). It is inspecting the woodworkmanship.

A narrow-billed woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes angustirostris) ascends a tree trunk in the Pantanal, Brazil
A narrow-billed woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes angustirostris) ascends a tree trunk in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a chaco chachalaca (Ortalis canicollis). I like to call them Pantanal chickens.

A chaco chachalaca (Ortalis canicollis) is about to make its very loud duet call in the Pantanal, Brazil
A chaco chachalaca (Ortalis canicollis) is about to make its very loud duet call in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a plush-crested jay (Cyanocorax chrysops). It thinks it isn’t crazy.

A plush-crested jay (Cyanocorax chrysops) is intensely scrutinising in the Pantanal, Brazil
A plush-crested jay (Cyanocorax chrysops) is intensely scrutinising in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata). It thought it was safe from us at night.

A spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata) is disturbed in the Pantanal, Brazil
A spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata) is disturbed in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a buff-necked ibis (Theristicus caudatus). It is rarely not being loud.

A buff-necked ibis (Theristicus caudatus) prepares to call loudly in the Pantanal, Brazil
A buff-necked ibis (Theristicus caudatus) prepares to call loudly in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia). Watching out for armadillos.

A burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) guards its burrow entrance in the Pantanal, Brazil
A burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) guards its burrow entrance in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

This is a not a bird, it is a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), but as king of the rodents I felt it should have a shout out!

A capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) seeks relief from the heat in the Pantanal, Brazil
A capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) seeks relief from the heat in the Pantanal, Brazil (Photo by James Russell)

There are about 125 more bird species around the farm I haven’t covered here, and 800 more in the entire Pantanal!

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