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Aubrey Roberts

Aubrey Roberts is a graduate student in paleontology, working with National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jørn Hurum and grantee Gareth Dyke. She writes from the field and the lab with a new take on very, very old things. Her main field of work focuses on ancient marine reptiles from Svalbard (Norway).

Heaven Is a Hole of Dirt

In the final stretch of the season’s excavations, Tanja becomes super excited when she discovers a jaw piece of an Omphalosaurus—a strange reptile that would shock dentists round the world.

It’s a Nice Day for a Mud Wedding

What better place to say your vows than surrounded by your best friends and sea monster fossils on a nearly frozen island?

Another Hill Bites The Dust

Snow, rain and wind may break our bones, but will never defeat us. Every inch of shale we remove to uncover fossilised bones, is a small victory for science. New species and discoveries are hiding in the mountain and we are full of excitement. Excavating a 247 million year old bone bed can be challenging,…

Back In Black – Shales

Professor and Emerging Explorer Jørn Hurum and his team, has returned to the Norwegian Arctic to search for fossils of ancient marine reptiles. We are back in the black Triassic rocks for two weeks to find some sensationally new finds of animals that lived in the seas over 240 million years ago. By Aubrey J…

Prehistoric Sea Monsters Emerge From the Arctic Landscape

This has been a season of surprises. Findings we thought would be huge, turned out to be, well, nothing, while finds we thought would be small turned into major excavations!

Three Levels of Arctic Sea Monster Fossils Revealed

This year’s field season up in the Svalbard archipelago is revealing marine reptile fossils of different kinds spanning millions of years.

How to Put an 18-Foot Sea Monster Into the Limelight

The fossil called “Gamla,” star of the National Geographic Channel documentary, “Death of a Sea Monster,” has been in a museum basement since 2009. Now for the first time, it’s being put on display.

Dwarf Dinosaurs vs. Giant Pterosaurs

Not-so-long necks? In what’s now Transylvania, the so-called island rule may have dwarfed the world’s largest land animal, making it prey for enormous winged reptiles.