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Robert Coburn

of National Geographic Explorers Journal

I've lived and traveled all over the United States and the world. I've been in Germany, Holland, Japan, New Zealand and Australia. I've completed sustainability projects in the latter two countries and studied and written on advanced theoretical biology and technology topics, like artificial life and the search for alien organisms in strange places.

People say I am very funny and entertaining. I suppose I am. I am very passionate about a lot of topics and great at analyzing things to an interminable depth. I'm highly imaginative and daydream a lot—not on the job, mind you.

Writing has always been my primary focus and greatest area of expertise. I'm currently involved in writing a monograph on first-line HIV treatments, as well as a fictional novel.

My interests include biological and geological history, travel (but who doesn't say that, right?), weight training, nature, photography, romanticized historical movies and books, exploration and investigation.

I help National Geographic explorers and grantees to publish blogs live from the field, and write original posts covering their work as well.

Can We Stop the Sixth Mass Extinction?

Rewilding, de-extinction, and an old-fashioned change of heart could all help stem the tide of biodiversity loss in our time.

The Causes Big and Small of the Sixth Mass Extinction

As we reach out across the planet and attempt to exploit it, for better or worse, the cost of our activities appears ever more burdensome. What could be driving such an obviously risky enterprise for our species?

Sixth Mass Extinction Really Started Thousands of Years Ago

The sixth mass extinction may have begun as a natural shift in the past, but it is increasingly a human problem in the present. In order to avert this recurring tragedy, humanity must learn from the extinctions of the past.

Indigenous Water Testing in Remote Russia

Jon Waterhouse and his team recently undertook a journey to Yakutia in eastern Siberia to bring water testing to the indigenous people of the region. The immensity and character of Russia weren’t the only things that awed them.

Africa’s Last Tropical Glaciers: Watch for Free

The film Snows of the Nile has won a major award, and to celebrate, it is being made available to watch for free!

The Flying Classroom Comes to Palau

Barrington Irving brings the Flying Classroom to Palau to dive its magnificent waters… and harvest water snake venom!

London Could Become a National Park … Sign Up to Be a Founder!

Sign-up now to show your support in making London a national park in Britain—and be entered into the list of its founders!

The Wiley and Surprisingly Cute Hyena

Cute hyena photos—no longer an oxymoron! Jessica Vitale reveals a side of hyenas we seldom see.

Watch the Okavango Hangout Video!

The Okavango Google Hangout event is over, but you can still watch the recording and catch up on the highlights!

Eric Chen’s Galápagos Getaway

Eric Chen is the grand prize winner of this year’s Google Science Fair for his work on new influenza treatments. As part of his prize, he was invited by National Geographic to tour the Galapagos Islands and encounter all that nature has to offer. For this young biochemist, visiting the cradle of the theory of evolution was a dream come true. National Geographic has been a Google Science Fair partner since it launched four years ago.

The Phantom Hogs of Kibale National Park

Rafael Reyna is a biologist fighting to protect the vanishing animals of eastern African rainforests. See a selection of the haunting photos gathered by his team.