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Preserving and Deciphering Ancient Rock Art in Texas

Ingenious research has revealed the hidden meaning in paintings more than 4,000 years old.

Renewed Excavations in the Rising Star Cave

More remains of Homo naledi and evidence about how the bones may have entered the cave may be on the way.

The Fish and Wildlife Service must atone for tiger’s death

By Delcianna J. Winders, PETA Foundation’s vice president and deputy general counsel for Captive Animal Law Enforcement Early last week, while I sat at work with my dachshund, Littles, by my side, another dachshund, Journey, found herself in the jaws of an escaped tiger who was roaming the streets of Henry County, Georgia. Journey survived the…

The Beauty and Lessons of a Cloud-Covered Total Eclipse

Many people treat failure as a negative variable best managed, mitigated, or outright avoided. Instead, failure is the dark matter of scientific knowledge—unseen but holding the universe together.

Exploring Earth’s wildest places to journey back in time

This is the first in a series of Voices posts by Dr Vivien Cumming, who explores remote regions of the world in search of photographically beautiful stories about how our planet works and the people who brave all nature throws at them to live in or study the natural world. Follow her blog here to go on a journey with her from Arctic Canada to the Southern Ocean.

They are usually grey, of variable hardness — you hopefully wouldn’t throw one at someone’s head! Sometimes they sparkle or contain a rainbow of colors. They don’t move unless pushed (by you or one of Earth’s many uncontrollable natural forces) and they make up the entire surface of our planet. You may have guessed what I’m talking about.…rocks!

Proposed Rare Earths Mine Threatens Protected Forest, Lemurs, and Farmers in Madagascar

By Edward Carver The device you are using right now, as you read this story, was likely made with rare earth elements from China. Rare earths are used in computers and cell phones, among many other modern devices, and demand for them continues to rise. But in the last several decades, rare earth mining has…

Local resilience succeeding against a global ocean of threats

By Nicanor Requena and Leobihildo Tamai      

Whether you enter tropical seas as a tourist or a researcher, or to ensure your family’s sustenance and sense of place as we do, two divergent trends loom on the horizon. First, our coral reefs provide an astonishingly rich source of biodiversity, protein, jobs and income, and can for generations to come. But second, they face existential threats.

As native Belizeans, we know what’s at stake. Respected marine scientist Dr. John Bruno just delivered the latest diagnosis following his many summers visiting our backyard. Twice-daily surveys showed him irreversible degradation of the western hemisphere’s largest barrier reef. Worldwide, reefs are under siege from sediment, plastic, algae, polluted runoff, hypoxic zones, invasive species, and perhaps most importantly, overfishing. Worse still, a changing global climate has made tropical waters hotter and more acidic, transforming some reefs into bleached and barren coral graveyards.

Interview with National Geographic Society’s Dr. Aurora Elmore

By Reaganne Hansford

It all started with a question: Why? Why, with the state of today’s world, do you still care? This question could be asked to anyone, at any point in our Earth’s history, and the answer would be interesting. So I decided to ask the people who are usually the ones asking this three-letter word, employees of National Geographic, “Why?”

Tragic Murder of Prominent Conservationist a Grave Blow to Defense of the Living Planet

Wayne Lotter’s life mission was to protect elephants and dismantle the illegal ivory market. He had known for some time that he was a target. Wealthy people in high places that had benefitted for decades from the poaching of illegal wildlife in Tanzania were very angry. Despite the danger, he bravely chose to continue to fight ‘the war’ as he always called it. He was tragically murdered this week in a ‘hit’ that police are investigating. 

Monitoring macroinvertebrates on the Galapagos ‘Enchanted Islands’

My experience with the ecological monitoring 2017

By Camila Arnés Urgellés

It was 5:30am when the motor of the Queen Mabel ship was turned off after navigating all night towards Punta Moreno, our first stop in the west of the archipelago. The sun still wasn’t out and we were getting ready for our first dive of the day. A cold breeze swept against us as we propelled ourselves by Zodiac toward the first dive site, but I was more overcome by the excitement of knowing that soon I would be below the water, immersed by this enchanted place. “Ready, one, two, three…” was our signal to enter the water at the same time. While I descended, I could see a garden of corals, algae, fish, turtles and stars of thousands of colors. Having only started my volunteer program at the Charles Darwin Foundation less than three months ago, I could not believe that this was going to be my work-site for a week…

Viewing the Solar Eclipse—in 1937

By Melissa Sagen “Like a hungry small boy sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner, an astronomer at a total eclipse of the sun is there to get all he can while he has the chance. The boy is determined to stuff himself with as much turkey as possible while it lasts, and the astronomer is eager…

The River Runs Through Us

By Abbie Gascho Landis I stand, dripping, in Alabama’s Paint Rock River, and what looks like a rock in my hand is alive. She is a native freshwater mussel called a snuffbox. Her apricot-sized shell meets in a blunted edge, forming a curving triangle, which is mottled yellowish and dark brown. I have lifted her…

Romanian bears and wolves: to kill or not to kill, that is the question

By Masha Kalinina, International Trade Policy Specialist, Humane Society International, and Gabriel Paun, Biologist and President of Agent Green Romania

On Monday, footage surfaced in international media of brown bears “besieging” a Romanian village. The clip shows the animals scavenging for food in trash bins, walking through the town, and running past bewildered pedestrians. Unfortunately, images like these can invoke fear among the public and play very well into the hands of those who seek to justify the slaughter of bears (and other carnivores) in Romania.

Remembering Lady Liuwa, the ‘Last Lioness’ of Zambia’s Liuwa Plain

Posted by African Parks A legendary lioness fondly known as ‘Lady Liuwa’, that lived in Liuwa Plain National Park in Zambia, died of natural causes on August 9, 2017, just one day before World Lion Day. African Parks, a conservation NGO which manages national parks and protected areas across Africa, has been managing Liuwa Plain…

Remembering Lady Liuwa

By Rob Reid, African Parks It doesn’t matter how much you know about lions, or what you think you know about them, how many scientific publications you’ve read, nor how much time you’ve spent with them.  They will always surprise you.  None more so than a very beautiful lady that I’ve known for the last three years.…