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Protect. Transform. Inspire.

The Nature Conservancy is uniquely positioned to be a leader in taking on the most complex challenges facing the planet. Our place-based projects in over 40 countries serve as living laboratories where new ideas to protect nature are tested, perfected and adapted for other places. We engage businesses, governments and communities in delivering these on-the-ground results – demonstrating how conservation innovations can transform how our food, water and energy are produced. And by empowering more leaders and communities all over the world with solutions that work, we will inspire action at the scale of the challenge.

Tracker Dogs Are an Elephant’s Best Friend

By Ami Vitale, National Geographic photographer

When I visited Loisaba Conservancy, 56,000 pristine acres in northern Kenya that had been protected by The Nature Conservancy and others, I became smitten with two fellows named Warrior and Machine. These bloodhounds are 200+ total pounds of loving, slobbery goodness. Not only are they adorable, but they are true heroes. These big lads are protecting a better-known group of gentle giants: elephants, in one of the most enchanting landscapes on earth. Shared on #WorldElephantDay

This Decade’s Most Important Climate Solution

By Justin Adams, Global Managing Director for Lands at The Nature Conservancy “A geo-engineering solution, but without any of the risk.” That’s how Jeff Seabright, Unilever’s Chief Sustainability Officer, described nature’s role in carbon mitigation at the Business & Climate Summit 2016 in London. We all know meeting the world’s new commitment to limit global…

Indonesia’s East Kalimantan Province Commits to New Green Growth Pathway

By Justin Adams, Global Managing Director of Lands at The Nature Conservancy and Rizal Algamar, Indonesia Country Program Director at The Nature Conservancy Earlier this month, more than 1,000 people gathered for World Environment Day in Samarinda, the capital of Indonesia’s East Kalimantan province. It was a moment – shared by millions of people all over…

Lessons on Fish Migration Crucial for Protecting Communities, Livelihoods and Food

By Giulio Boccaletti, Global Managing Director for Water at The Nature Conservancy and Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy One day in 2014 a female eel set off from Nova Scotia on a long and hazardous journey to her spawning grounds. This was no ordinary eel.  Scientists had released her with…

Fish Run Through It: The Importance of Maintaining and Reconnecting Free-Flowing Rivers

By Jeff Opperman, Director and Lead Scientist, Great Rivers Program, The Nature Conservancy Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it.  – Norman Maclean This sparse sentence by Norman Maclean comprises some of the most beautiful words written about rivers in the English language. It captures how rivers serve as living…

Common Land, Common Ground

By Justin Adams, Global Managing Director for Lands at The Nature Conservancy. Edward Loure and The Nature Conservancy have a common story. The story is one of reducing conflict by finding common ground—in this case both literally and metaphorically. All over the world – in fact, for 2.5 billion people – lives depend on land…

Quick Take: Nature Protects People

By Kathy Baughman McLeod, Managing Director, Coastal Risk & Resilience, The Nature Conservancy This week, I’m in South Florida with partners from local government, the private sector and the international community to highlight the vital role that nature plays in protecting people in Miami-Dade County and coastal communities around the world. Miami-Dade is one of…

Not All Forestry Is Carbon Equal

By Justin Adams, Global Managing Director for Lands at The Nature Conservancy The UN’s International Day of Forests is on March 21. While some people might see this as merely a day for tree-huggers to crunch their granola a little louder, this day is important for celebrating one of the most valuable ecosystems — not…

How Can We Catch Tuna and Protect Sharks?

Mike Sweeney, Managing Director of Global Fisheries, The Nature Conservancy Steven Victor, Director of Micronesia Program, The Nature Conservancy Shark fin soup has become a symbol of mistreatment of marine life. Sharks caught for their fins are tossed back into the sea. Unable to swim, they starve to death, are eaten or drown. People pay…

A Bluefin Tuna for $118,000: Going, Going … Gone?

By Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy Bluefin tuna is one of the ocean’s most prized fish, an icon of both modern and classic civilizations and a key predator in the ocean’s delicate food chain. And yet its very existence on this planet is now up to us — the…

With the Global Climate Deal in Paris, the Real Work is Ahead

By: Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy A lot of discussions are going on after the Paris climate agreement. There is no doubt that this agreement is not enough to secure a future for both people and nature. It is also absolutely sure that the target of limiting temperature increase…

Paris Agreement Catalyzes Global Cooperation Toward a Low-Carbon Future

Worker’s clean solar panels for maximum efficiency at the power solar facility in Lancaster, California. Photo credit: © Dave Lauridsen for The Nature Conservancy By Lynn Scarlett, Managing Director of Public Policy and Global Climate for The Nature Conservancy Paris is again in the news—and, this time, as host to nearly all the world’s nations who…

COP21: ‘Ocean Challenges’ Provide a Path Forward

By Laura Whitford, Coral Triangle Program Manager at The Nature Conservancy Over the past two weeks in Paris, world leaders came together to work out a global agreement on climate change at COP21. People were optimistic that Paris would be different than Copenhagen and that countries would come determined to bring and share their best efforts…

Quick Take: The Ocean is a Global Climate Solution

By Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy As many people around the world know, the United Nations climate change conference (COP21) in Paris begins in just a few days. And as I wrote in this month’s Cornerstone Journal of Sustainable Finance and Banking, we are at a critical crossroads in…

Sixty Years of Data Show Waves are Getting Stronger, Threatening Coastlines and Infrastructure

By The Nature Conservancy’s Dr. Borja G. Reguero and Dr. Michael W. Beck Climate change is modifying the way our oceans work in many different ways, including ocean acidification and water warming. But where people really start to pay attention is where humans and oceans meet: the coast. On the coast, most people have heard…