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Giving To Get: Reciprocity Among Mountain Lions

Please Note: This is the first of two blogs about a research paper published today in Science Advances providing the first evidence of complex social strategies in any solitary carnivore—and showing that mountain lions in particular are more social than previously thought. Part Two will chronicle how territorial males structure social interactions among mountain lions.…

Empowering Children through Snow Leopard Conservation in the High Pamirs of Tajikistan

By Bianca Rosen Four-year-old Aruke Atabaev has plump cheeks that devour her face and a smile that makes the toughest of soldiers fall to their knees. She helps her mother—Jamila, wife of Mahan Atabaev who is the leader of a community-based wildlife conservancy in the Eastern Pamir Mountains of Tajikistan—set and clear dining tables, always…

Do Mountain Lions Rival McDonald’s?

Stinky dead meat. Oddly, I’ve come to love the stench of it, even though it sometimes turns my stomach. It’s become a badge of honor and a symbol of what I do, hiking long days in search of prey killed by mountain lions. Sometimes the stink helps me locate the carcass, or the sounds of…

Slow Conservation and Slow Journalism Converge in the Pamirs of Central Asia

It’s 5 p.m., and the sun’s last rays cast a golden glow on an empty road in the eastern Pamirs of Tajikistan. This route was once the Silk Road plied by merchants, nomads, and pilgrims and later by British and Russian soldiers and agents engaged in the territorial contest between Britain and Russia known as…

Conservation in Changtang: Securing a Future for the Snow Leopard

In early 2015, WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and Panthera initiated a joint project to fill the gaps in understanding about the conservation status of snow leopards and to implement appropriate actions to protect them in China. Particular emphasis is being paid to the animals in the Changtang landscape of the Tibet Autonomous Region. Here they share a day’s conservation work with local colleagues.

Imagining a world without lions

As conservationists we get a little wound up sometimes, thinking about how to save wildlife, their environment and the whole of the natural world. But there are times when I like to take a step back and reflect. Sure, I will be mortified if, in the near future, I awake and look out from our…

The Fish and Wildlife Service must atone for tiger’s death

By Delcianna J. Winders, PETA Foundation’s vice president and deputy general counsel for Captive Animal Law Enforcement Early last week, while I sat at work with my dachshund, Littles, by my side, another dachshund, Journey, found herself in the jaws of an escaped tiger who was roaming the streets of Henry County, Georgia. Journey survived the…

Remembering Lady Liuwa, the ‘Last Lioness’ of Zambia’s Liuwa Plain

Posted by African Parks A legendary lioness fondly known as ‘Lady Liuwa’, that lived in Liuwa Plain National Park in Zambia, died of natural causes on August 9, 2017, just one day before World Lion Day. African Parks, a conservation NGO which manages national parks and protected areas across Africa, has been managing Liuwa Plain…

Remembering Lady Liuwa

By Rob Reid, African Parks It doesn’t matter how much you know about lions, or what you think you know about them, how many scientific publications you’ve read, nor how much time you’ve spent with them.  They will always surprise you.  None more so than a very beautiful lady that I’ve known for the last three years.…

Expanding Beyond Conventional Conservation to Save African Lions

There is a lion in Tanzania who ignites my passion. A beautiful young male ranging through one of our focal areas, a place where people and lions cohabitate and sometimes conflict. I’ve been tracking him for several years now, and still, he survives. He is part of a coalition with two other males. About a…

The Faceless Lions of Mozambique

To rescue the remaining lions of the Mozambican population the Greater Limpopo Carnivore Program is implementing a dedicated anti poaching team – the Limpopo Lion Protection Unit. With funding from National Geographic’s Big Cat Initiative we’ve secured major logistical support and with additional funding currently being sought, hope to deploy our first unit of locally employed rangers in September 2017.

Remembering George Rabb, a Driving Force Behind the National Geographic Big Cats Initiative

Last week, the National Geographic Society and the global community of conservationists writ large lost George Rabb, an iconic, stalwart advocate and icon for wildlife, the environment, and the biodiversity sciences.  Most recently, Dr. Rabb served on National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative (BCI) Grants Committee.  Since 2010 until mid-2017, he and seven other leading conservationists…

The Big Conservation Lie: Overview and Interview With the Authors

  Conservation is rightfully celebrated for its contribution to preserving iconic wildlife in their natural habitats. Yet there are those who question some of its ethics, wondering where people fit into the bigger picture.  With a no-holds-barred analysis (some might say assault on) the widely held African conservation paradigm, The Big Conservation Lie is a contentious, indeed…

Cats of Cuba

It’s not easy being a cat in Cuba.

There’s no flea medicine, no cat litter and no catnip. Historically, they’ve been relegated to second-class status after dogs. During the “special period” of the early 90s when food was scarce following the breakup of the Soviet Union, they disappeared from the streets. And occasionally, they’ve been used in Santeria ceremonies.

But like many aspects of life in Cuba today, things are changing. And for cats, that change is for the better.

How the National Geographic Society Has Rebooted to Help Restore Earth’s Natural Equilibrium

Six months into his new position as National Geographic chief scientist, Jonathan Baillie, the former conservation programmes director of the Zoological Society of London, outlined his “scientific vision” for how the National Geographic Society would work to help create a a planet that’s going to provide for 9 billion people — and all forms of other life. “How do we do this with 9 billion people on the planet? This is the great challenge we all face. National Geographic now needs to think about its unique role helping us face this challenge,” Baillie told hundreds of National Geographic explorers and staff gathered at the Society’s headquarters for this week’s Explorers Festival.