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Feral Cat debate: Trap-Neuter-Return Is Sound Public Policy

By Peter J. Wolf, Cat Initiatives Analyst for Best Friends Animal Society It was typical of the dog park interactions one so often hears about: I thought to ask the pet’s name but not his owner’s. In this case, though, it wasn’t a dog park—or a dog. The unidentified cat owner and I were waiting,…

Scientists Successfully Collar Three More Wild Snow Leopards in Mongolia

Post submitted by Matthias Fiechter.  GPS collars will allow Snow Leopard Trust researchers to better understand the elusive species. In a remarkably successful expedition, three more snow leopards have been equipped with GPS collars in the Tost Nature Reserve in Mongolia’s South Gobi province this April. Two of them are male, and one is female. They’re…

Are we coming or going? Stakeholder engagement in the four corners

Post submitted by Lise Hanssen, Project Coordinator of Kwando Carnivore Project If there was checklist for setting up a lion conflict mitigation project in rural Namibia (or anywhere else I would imagine), first on the list would be engaging with the affected community.  In the case of the Chobe floodplains, this means seven conservancies with…

Exploring the use of five types of puma vocalizations

Post submitted by Max Allen – University of Wisconsin Communication is an important component of animal behavior, but is difficult to study in the wild. This is especially true for cryptic wildlife species, such as carnivores, that are difficult to observe. Recent advances in the technology of motion-triggered video cameras now enable researchers to remotely…

The Lion and the Cow: Conservation, Pastoralism, and Conflict

The recurring thought of lions and cows keeps interrupting my focus on a humid evening as I sit down to dinner outside a small hotel overlooking the din of downtown Kampala. I’m conversing with a Dodoth gentleman of the Karamojong tribe in the northeastern region of Uganda—a place with little infrastructure and an abundance of wildlife. Loupa Pius is a project…

Marching For (Cat) Science

I grew up catching animals of all sorts. I kept buckets full of jumping spiders, turtles and snakes. At five-years-old, under the careful instruction of my grandfather, I miraculously caught a rabbit in a flimsy butterfly net attached to the end of a bamboo shoot. After parading it proudly about the house, I released it…

Where There’s a Bear, There’s a Big Cat

By Liu Mingyu, PhD Student, Peking University One morning last July, I woke just outside the Zhaxilawu monastery to the sound of howling dogs. The monastery lies in China’s Qinghai province, where Panthera, the Snow Leopard Trust, and Shan Shui have partnered to research and protect snow leopards and their landscapes. In addition to working…

National Geographic Photo Ark Spotlight: Ocelot

Listed as an Endangered Species by the United States, the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) numbers fewer than a hundred individuals north of the Rio Grande (in small pockets of southern Texas and Southern Arizona) — and it is likely to be even more disturbed and threatened by an enhanced border wall with Mexico.

Tiger Cubs: A Sign of Hope in Thailand

By Chris Hallam MSc Monitoring Advisor Every success in the conservation world is worth celebrating—no matter what species, location or size of impact. But some feel more significant than others… and the recent news out of Thailand is a perfect example. In Thailand, Panthera has partnered with the Thai Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant…

Bhutan: Ecological Heart of the Eastern Himalaya

For a region as rich in biodiversity as the Eastern Himalaya, Bhutan’s healthy population of wild cats, including snow leopard in the north and tiger elsewhere, can serve to repopulate adjoining landscapes as long as the habitats are protected. Bhutan can function as the ecological heart of the Eastern Himalaya, sustaining rural people as well as unique species of wild cats in this large mountainous landscape. For these reasons, investing in Bhutan’s conservation efforts is beneficial to the world!

Fishing Cats Quietly Slink Out of Existence in Southeast Asia

After extensive camera trap surveys in key habitat failed to reveal a single fishing cat in Java, conservationists fear that the unique water-loving feline may be on the verge of extinction in Indonesia, if not already extirpated there. “If the fishing cat is gone from Indonesia, it is following the extinction of the Bali Tiger…

Big Cats on Camera

Volunteer crews with Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation have captured mountain lions, ocelots and bobcats on camera traps, and found sign of lynx and snow leopard.

National Geographic Photo Ark Spotlight: Lynx

All four species of lynx have been photographed for the National Geographic Photo Ark project, where they act as ambassadors for an extraordinary medium-size wild cat found across much of the Northern Hemisphere, where they all prey primarily on rabbits. They share more than a preference for rabbit; all of them are challenged by habitat-loss due to human development and climate change.

Big Love for Small Cats

Every cat, big and small, should be valued and protected. We strive for a world where all domestic cats have a safe community in which to live, including those whose homes are outdoors.

TNR Is Dangerous Both to Cats and to Other Animals

People who consider themselves “cat lovers,” including proponents of trap-neuter-release (TNR) —programs that sterilize but then abandon domestic cats and so should more aptly be called “trap-neuter-abandon”—don’t mean to consign cats to ghastly fates, but in leaving them outside to fend for themselves, they do.