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Viewing the Solar Eclipse—in 1937

By Melissa Sagen “Like a hungry small boy sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner, an astronomer at a total eclipse of the sun is there to get all he can while he has the chance. The boy is determined to stuff himself with as much turkey as possible while it lasts, and the astronomer is eager…

Ideas Are Like Eggs: Once Hatched, They Have Wings

What started with a 3rd-grade animal report on the ring-tailed lemur has become a complete dedication to the people, plants, and animals of Madagascar. The ideas of a 9-year-old-me are now truly taking flight, as I train a new generation of Harvard students to help protect this unique land.

Let’s Talk About Sex—At the Dawn of Life on Earth

Whether sexual or asexual, reproduction is a necessity for all organisms that want to ensure their genetic material survives after they’ve bitten the dust (or in this case, the wet sand). Half-a-billion-year-old animals are no different.

Crossing the Okavango Delta: 2017

I can see a hippo just over the top popping up for air and snorting every few minutes in the river. I can’t tell how many birds I am listening to. I could be in a tree on a perfect summer day anywhere, but it’s winter and I’m in Botswana.

Get Inspired and Challenged by Native Youth Congress

One thing is clear where Jon and these kids come from in Native America: there’s not much sugar-coating going on. When you ask a hard question in Indian Country, you’ll likely get a harder answer.

What ‘Planet of the Apes’ & Caesar Show Us About Our Own Evolution

“Planet of the Apes” might not be our future, but it really was our past. Actors Andy Serkis and Karin Konoval—and Nat Geo Explorer Lee Berger—reveal how.

Microplastics in a Macroworld: Water Sampling in Patagonia

Dylan Jones describe his experience backpacking through the spectacular landscape of the future Patagonia National Park and collecting microplastic samples for Adventure Scientists’ Global Microplastics Initiative.

Fossil-Finding 101: How to Spot the Right Rocks

A question that members of the research team often get regarding our work in the South Australian outback is simply how we know where to excavate fossil beds. It’s a good question—an important aspect of the paleontological process is simply identifying the best places to look for fossils.

A Family of Explorers in Search of Some of Earth’s Oldest Fossils

Emily Hughes has been following her mother, paleontologist Mary Droser, into the field all her life. This summer the family is back in Australia digging up some of Earth’s oldest fossils.

Into a Vulture Lover’s Paradise

The vultures of Jaldessa Conservancy in northern Kenya are flourishing amidst the livestock and human communities of the region.

Hōkūleʻa Returns Home

This marks the first time in history that a Polynesian voyaging canoe has sailed around the world. The crew used ancient Polynesian wayfinding techniques, observing the stars, ocean, winds, birds and other signs of nature as mapping points for direction.

Using Positive Feedback for Training Elephants in Thailand

I have come to realize over the course of my visit that this is an incredibly sensitive complex concern, one that needs a multi-prong strategy, as one solution does not fit all the regional contexts.

Pushing the frontiers of human exploration, on Earth and beyond

Should we be going to Mars, the moon and other places beyond Earth when we are not able to properly explore and take care of our home planet? Is the huge money being spent on extraterrestrial exploration the best investment we can make when we still haven’t seen, let alone, mapped most of the ocean floor?

These fundamental questions were at the heart of an hour-long debate at today’s National Geographic Explorers Festival in Washington, D.C.

National Geographic Buffet Awards 2017: Rosamira Guillen and Olivier Nsengimana

What do two Critically Endangered enigmatic animals — a majestic wading bird in Africa and an adorable monkey with a shock of white hair in South America — have in common at the National Geographic Explorers Festival? They each have a remarkable champion advocating and working for their survival who have been recognized with the 2017 National Geographic Buffet Award.

Secrets for successful science communication: Story-selling, sciencetelling, your passionate self

Want to get the secret sauce for effective communication of science? Three of National Geographic’s most famous explorers shared their advice and experience at the National Geographic Explorers Festival in Washington, D.C. today.