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How a Vaccine for Chickens Can Help Save the Lemurs

Since time immemorial, local Malagasy have hunted and eaten terrestrial wildlife for food, including birds, tenrecs, bats, carnivores and lemurs. While this meat is rich in nutrients and has historically been plentiful, wildlife stocks have steadily declined in response to overhunting. Can chickens replace this dependency on wild meat?

How we can do more with less water – and then give some back to nature

In her just-released book, Replenish: The Virtuous Cycle of Water and Prosperity, Sandra Postel makes the case that building water security in the 21st Century requires that we enlist nature’s help in preparing for floods, droughts, wildfires and water shortages.  In this Q&A, Sandra talks about our false narratives around water, why she refrains from using the term “water resource,” and what gives her hope for solving society’s big water challenges.

Bikepacking The Abandoned

My bicycle is knee deep in mud. The snowline on the nearby mountains is closer than the previous day. The abandoned track has been softened by the stomping of cattle. After an hour of pushing my loaded bike half a mile through the mud, I begin the task of setting up camp. The only suitable…

Diving With Borneo Sharks: Shark Sanctuary or Slaughterhouse?

The shark appears from the blue, soaring in the current like a 707 in a holding pattern.  Doglike, the curious shark investigates open mouthed, eyeing my friend’s flippers. Six feet long and sinuous, she glides along behind us until with a switch of her tail and a flare of her pectoral fins, she is off,…

Preparing for Floods, Droughts and Water Shortages by Working with, Rather than Against, Nature

Decades ago, Albert Einstein reminded us of a fundamental lesson that’s hard to learn: “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” Fortunately, just when it’s crucially needed, a new mind-set about water is taking shape. It’s one that blends engineering, ecology, economics, and related fields into a more holistic approach that recognizes the fundamental value of nature’s services.

How scientists and developers can work together to prevent the mass extinction of life on Earth

The 6th mass extinction in the history of the Earth is underway — and it has been triggered by mankind! (eowilsonfoundation.org). Despite this horrific reality, all hope is not lost and there are still things we can do to stop it. Here is what a bird of prey researcher in Kenya believes is a vital part of halting this catastrophe.

National Geographic Explorer Jason De León Named MacArthur Foundation 2017 Fellow

National Geographic Emerging Explorer (2013) Jason De León is one of 24 MacArthur Foundation 2017 Fellows announced today. The anthropologist’s multidisciplinary approach to the study of migration from Latin America to the United States is bringing to light the lives and deaths of clandestine migrants crossing the U.S.–Mexico border into the Sonoran Desert of Arizona, MacArthur says on…

Fridtjof Nansen: Modern Explorers Retrace His Steps

Modern explorers  Børge Ousland and Thomas Ulrich set to trace the route of Fridtjof Nansen and Hjalmar Johansen. “We came to their wintering hut at Jackson Island, which was a touching and very special moment,” writes Ousland. “Here the two explorers spent the winter in 1895-96 with very little equipment, not really knowing where they were. That they survived is a feat second to none in Arctic history.”

Life & Glaciers

  Life & Glaciers (Patagonia’s Untold Stories)   Its skin is splitting open down its back. Three pairs of lateral attachment points keep its streamlined body glued to the submerged rock. It will use the glacial raging torrent to its advantage. With the last air in its body, it inflates its thorax to free itself from…

Slow Conservation and Slow Journalism Converge in the Pamirs of Central Asia

It’s 5 p.m., and the sun’s last rays cast a golden glow on an empty road in the eastern Pamirs of Tajikistan. This route was once the Silk Road plied by merchants, nomads, and pilgrims and later by British and Russian soldiers and agents engaged in the territorial contest between Britain and Russia known as…

Climate Change Survival: Choose Your Own Adventure

We are at a point today where every decision we make counts in deciding what America’s climate change story will be–including the fundamental decision of how we tell climate change stories.

Preserving and Deciphering Ancient Rock Art in Texas

Ingenious research has revealed the hidden meaning in paintings more than 4,000 years old.

Origins of a Mysterious Arachnid Revealed

Reconstructing schizomid history in Micronesia led us to tackle the most fundamental questions about these animals, namely, what are they, where did they come from, and when did they arise?

Whale of a tale: How a Mexican fishing village found ownership of its cetaceans

National Geographic Explorer Katherina Audley of the Whales of Guerrero Research Project continues her report of how the folk of Barra de Potosí, a tiny fishing village located in Southwest Pacific Mexico, discovered and became entranced with the whales and dolphins off their coast. She explains the techniques she and her colleagues used to hook the interest of the children, then the wider community, and how the village started developing a pride of ownership of the marine mammals. 

The Meaning and Mystery of Lascaux, 77 Years After Its Discovery

In a moment of wonder and elation 77 years ago today, four French teenagers discovered more than just their missing dog.