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Can a gentle giant of Philippine coral reefs be saved from extinction in the wild?

We once lived in a world full of giants – blue whales freely swimming in our oceans and large animals such as elephants roaming our land. Unfortunately, populations of terrestrial and marine megafauna have declined dramatically in recent years. African elephant populations have declined from an estimated 1.3 million to around 600,000. Populations of big…

The surprising diversity of Sunda clouded leopard communication behaviors

Sunda clouded leopards (Neofelis diardi) are part of the Panthera lineage of felids that includes African lions (Panthera leo), tigers (Panthera tigris), and jaguars (Panthera onca). These are among the most charismatic wildlife species, but Sunda clouded leopards are the least understood and studied of this group. Sunda clouded leopards are found in Borneo and…

‘Planetary Boundaries’ a flawed mechanism to safeguard Earth’s biodiversity, scientists warn

The notion that human impacts will be fine, so long as we keep them within “planetary boundaries” is seductive, but deeply flawed scientifically. Worse, though well-intentioned, it encourages harmful policies, three of the world’s leading ecologists argue in a peer-reviewed commentary published this month in Trends in Ecology & Evolution.

“A critical question is how should we manage human actions that harm the natural world,” said Stuart L. Pimm, Doris Duke Professor of Conservation at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment. “Do we really want to operate under the assumption – as the notion of a planetary boundary for biodiversity purports – that humans can go about business as usual so long as the impacts of our actions remain within some arbitrary ‘safe operating space’?”

Letting the Foxes ‘Protect’ the Hens in Ryan Zinke’s Department of Interior

On November 8, U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Secretary Ryan Zinke announced the creation of an International Wildlife Conservation Council that will advise him. As a recent Science Policy Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science assigned to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Division of International Conservation, I’ve watched the…

Madidi is Madidi: Discovering the Biodiversity of a Record-Breaking Park (Photos)

I often feel like a kid in a candy store. As a biologist working in the most biologically diverse protected area in the world, sometimes I really do have to pinch myself. In a place as diverse as Madidi, I am privileged every day to see a life form I have not encountered before. Every day there is something new to behold, and every now and then these personal revelations are discoveries for the broader scientific community.

Baboons Behaving Badly

Lock your doors. And your windows. Don’t make eye contact. Keep your bread roll close to your chest, or it may get snatched…by a baboon. The situation in Gorongosa National Park is not this extreme. The baboons are generally a friendly nuisance, and for many, a tourist attraction. However, in other national parks the situation…

Knowing Jane

By David Greer Like many aspiring conservationists, I was captivated as a youngster while watching videos of Jane Goodall’s early years in the forest interacting with the fascinating chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania.  I was hooked.   I was determined that I would end up working in Africa on their behalf–it was merely a…

Salamander Rediscovery Gets Search for Lost Species Off to Promising Start

By Don Church, Global Wildlife Conservation president Before we even had a chance to launch our first expedition this fall in Global Wildlife Conservation’s Search for Lost Species, we somehow amazingly struck gold in Guatemala. That gold was in the form of the brilliantly yellow-hued Jackson’s Climbing Salamander, a species missing to science since its…

A Krill’s-Eye Video of New Zealand Seabirds

Music video or science documentary? This is both! We took a GoPro-rigged buoy out into New Zealand’s Hauraki Gulf, where multitudes of hungry seabirds were tracking swarms of fish and krill just below the surface of the sea. Featuring Darlingside‘s “The Ancestor” from the album Birds Say. Underwater footage courtesy of the Northern New Zealand Seabird Trust.…

The Short Yet Dramatic Lifecycle of The Patagonian Flightless Crane Fly

Flightless (Patagonia’s Untold Stories) It has finally pushed itself through the entangled root mats. Months of development feeding on wet detritus have come to an end. It will now emerge as a full-fledged adult. The upper portion of its body hangs perpendicular to the rock wall, exposed to the elements. It begins to break free…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #111

Wild Bird Trust presents the 111th Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week. Each one of these birds has their own unique life history. There are birds that migrate and those that are resident, birds that scavenge carrion and birds that eat nectar, birds that are active at night and those that are diurnal.…

Miami Blue butterfly discovered in Cuba amidst concerns it may have become extinct in the USA after Hurricane Irma.

From Marc Minno In early September Hurricane Irma left a wide path of destruction through the West Indies and Florida.  This category 5 storm not only devastated homes for people, but also ravaged natural habitats, which are homes for unique species of wildlife.  The Florida Keys and the northern coast of Cuba were particularly hard hit. In…

Why WildSpeak

So bring on the rebels, the ripples from pebbles, the painters, and poets, and plays… here’s to the fools who dream, crazy as they may seem. –La La Land. Films and visual imagery capture imaginations and dare us to envision a better future. La La Land dazzled our hearts last December with whimsical, up-beat tunes strung with a message of foolish hope against great odds. When Emma Stone’s character performs her vulnerable, breathtaking audition song, “The Fools Who Dream”, her passion stemming from a real place of her own story makes us feel what she is feeling and believe in her dream. We root for her completely. We empathize.

To Save Australia’s Outback, Indigenous Groups Connect With Nature

Note: This piece was updated on Nov. 14, 2017, with terminology to appropriately describe Indigenous communities in Australia. Flying across the width of Australia in July, from Sydney in the southeast to Broome in the northwest, I was mesmerized by the sweeping floodplains of the channel country and the seemingly endless rolling dunes of the…

In the Field with Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnakes

Much like anyone in the northern hemisphere on the first warm Saturday of the year, each spring the Eastern massasauga rattlesnake (EMR) emerges from the holes that it hibernates in all winter ready for some sun and a good meal to kick-start its growth and reproduction for the year. And each spring, a group of…