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The Cost Of Producing Food In A Warmer, Wetter World

By Eliza Roberts Manager, Water at Ceres Preliminary estimates for the costs of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria are in the hundreds of billions of dollars range—from disruption of business, to infrastructure and property damage, to crop losses. Each of the deadly storms hit agriculture especially hard, from cattle and soy in Texas, to citrus…

Studying the air-breathing lungfish, a descendant of the first terrestrial animal

Gorongosa National Park is an amazing place for research because of the diversity of habitats, and especially because of what I study:  the little-known but fascinating lungfish and its environment. The lungfish (Protopterus annectens) is an air-breathing fish found in the coastal rivers of Mozambique and other parts of southern Africa. Researchers have described its ability to “walk” on its fins on the river or pond floor.

Life & Glaciers

  Life & Glaciers (Patagonia’s Untold Stories)   Its skin is splitting open down its back. Three pairs of lateral attachment points keep its streamlined body glued to the submerged rock. It will use the glacial raging torrent to its advantage. With the last air in its body, it inflates its thorax to free itself from…

Sustainable Urban Water Systems: A View from the Tap

By Anisha Anantapadmanabhan Manager, Water Infrastructure, Ceres As Hurricane Harvey floodwaters recede, and Houston begins the long, expensive road to recovery, its civil engineers and city planners can learn from other cities that are embracing a sustainable water movement. Engineers, planners and financiers are coming together in many cities across the U.S. under a sustainable…

Back To School In The Garden, A Digital Lesson Guide For Educators

“I have a question,” Iliana said raising her hand and beckoning me over to her seat just before class ended. “Maybe you won’t be able to answer this,” she paused. “Well I’ll try, what’s up?” “So all this stuff with this environment and climate, is it irreversible?” Words piled up in my mouth, not sure…

Why the US Clean Water Rule Needs to Stay in Place

We have many lessons to learn from the tragedies wrought by Hurricane Harvey, but among the most important is that a broken water cycle increases risks to our communities and economies. Floodplains, tributaries, wetlands, lakes, ponds, rivers and groundwater form an interconnected whole that helps ensure clean, safe, reliable water supplies.  A well-functioning water cycle…

The River Runs Through Us

By Abbie Gascho Landis I stand, dripping, in Alabama’s Paint Rock River, and what looks like a rock in my hand is alive. She is a native freshwater mussel called a snuffbox. Her apricot-sized shell meets in a blunted edge, forming a curving triangle, which is mottled yellowish and dark brown. I have lifted her…

California Dairies Join Forces with Conservationists and an Irrigation Supplier to Save Water and Reduce Groundwater Pollution

For most of us, dairy products like milk, butter, cheese, and yogurt are an integral part of our daily diets. In fact, US residents consume on average more than 600 pounds of dairy products (expressed on a milk-equivalent basis) per year, according to the US Department of Agriculture. Some 9 million dairy cows meet that…

Messages on a Rock: How Our National Monuments Help Define Us

In coming weeks, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is expected to visit New Mexico to tour the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument and Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument as part of the administration’s hostile review of monuments in the West (the review ends Aug. 23). Despite overwhelming public support in New Mexico for the two monuments, not all of the state’s elected officials are on board. New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez recently wrote to Zinke that she supports the review of the two monuments “to analyze whether the designations make the best sense for New Mexico.”

I hope Secretary Zinke gets a chance to hike into the canyon and float the river. I hope he speaks to the many New Mexicans—from tribal leaders and ranchers to local mayors and business owners—who strongly support this monument and see it as part of their cultural identity.

What the River Knows: Saskatchewan Delta at Cumberland House, Canada.

I am the Saskatchewan River, Kisiskâciwani-sîpiy (in the Swampy Cree dialect, traditionally an oral language), and I have created the largest inland freshwater alluvial delta in North America. It covers approximately 3,860 square miles (10,000 square kilometers), larger than the Everglades National Park in Florida, yet I receive little recognition for this treasure, and almost no protection from the human forces that negatively affect me.

Sushi Roulette: Is the Fish You Ordered the One You Got?

Have plans this summer to visit your favorite sushi restaurant? You might order spicy tuna roll. Or maybe salmon or halibut. But is the fish you selected the one you got? If you’re in Los Angeles or many other cities around the globe, it’s a flip of the coin. Scientists at Loyola Marymount University, the…

How the National Geographic Society Has Rebooted to Help Restore Earth’s Natural Equilibrium

Six months into his new position as National Geographic chief scientist, Jonathan Baillie, the former conservation programmes director of the Zoological Society of London, outlined his “scientific vision” for how the National Geographic Society would work to help create a a planet that’s going to provide for 9 billion people — and all forms of other life. “How do we do this with 9 billion people on the planet? This is the great challenge we all face. National Geographic now needs to think about its unique role helping us face this challenge,” Baillie told hundreds of National Geographic explorers and staff gathered at the Society’s headquarters for this week’s Explorers Festival.

National Geographic Explorers a ‘Secret Weapon’ to Change the World, Says Society President Gary Knell

“This is truly National Geographic’s moment, because as Neil deGrasse Tyson says, the great thing about science is that it’s true, whether you believe it or not,” National Geographic Society President and CEO Gary E. Knell said at the opening of the Explorers Festival (#NatGeoFest) at National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C. today.

Knell told hundreds of National Geographic explorers and staff that the Society had been through a major transition that transformed the organization, “a transformation that better positioned National Geographic to address the multiple challenges facings its future, but more importantly, facing our planet. We figured out a way to support your critical work in a more direct way and tackle those issues by connecting and integrating our multimedia platforms. And today the content that we are generating, the stories we’re telling, the grants we’re making, the actions we’re taking are more needed and important than ever before.”

Reporter’s Notebook: Voices from the Mekong and Tonlé Sap Lake

Voices and stories from around Tonle Sap Lake and communities affected by the Lower Sesan II dam.

Hundreds of mayors, governors, CEOs and others pledge U.S. commitment to Paris climate agreement

Mike Bloomberg, the United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change, submitted yesterday an unprecedented statement of unity from hundreds of U.S. mayors, governors, state attorneys general, CEOs and others to achieve and eventually exceed America’s commitment to the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. In a letter to addressed jointly to U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres and the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa, Bloomberg presented this declaration, called “We Are Still In.”