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Category archives for Activism

Downwind: Living in the Shadows of Houston’s Refineries

When a balloon floats towards the sky, two-year old Rosalina Chronister tells her great grandmother, Esperanza, the balloon is visiting her sister, Ciera Rose, in heaven. Ciera Rose was only four when she died of cancer last fall. A few months ago, her family and their friends came together to remember this energetic child. They released balloons, marking her passing.

We Will March for the Ocean!

On Saturday, June 9, 2018 tens of thousands of people will March for the Ocean in Washington D.C. and across the nation and planet to mark the end of World Oceans Day weekend. Why? Because we have no choice! Our public seas, already in crisis, are now at hugely increased risk from the Trump administration…

A Parable of Refugees, or a History That Is True

I want to take you back nearly 80 years, to Mexico City in 1939, when Lázaro Cárdenas, a revolutionary-turned-politician, sat in the president’s seat and made a decision that no other president in the world would make. Across the Atlantic, the Spanish Civil War had come to a brutal end. The Republicans had fallen. General…

Why WildSpeak

So bring on the rebels, the ripples from pebbles, the painters, and poets, and plays… here’s to the fools who dream, crazy as they may seem. –La La Land. Films and visual imagery capture imaginations and dare us to envision a better future. La La Land dazzled our hearts last December with whimsical, up-beat tunes strung with a message of foolish hope against great odds. When Emma Stone’s character performs her vulnerable, breathtaking audition song, “The Fools Who Dream”, her passion stemming from a real place of her own story makes us feel what she is feeling and believe in her dream. We root for her completely. We empathize.

Diving With Borneo Sharks: Shark Sanctuary or Slaughterhouse?

The shark appears from the blue, soaring in the current like a 707 in a holding pattern.  Doglike, the curious shark investigates open mouthed, eyeing my friend’s flippers. Six feet long and sinuous, she glides along behind us until with a switch of her tail and a flare of her pectoral fins, she is off,…

A Tale of Two Houstons: Inequality in America’s Fossil Fuel Capital

After a week of exploring and photographing fossil fuel infrastructure and impacts in and around Houston, its 52 mile long ship channel, and the neighboring gulf coast, I am excited to finally get up in the air. Along with my other International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) colleague Karen Kasmauski, I am working on the Environmental Integrity Project’s (EIP) Human Cost of Energy Production initiative. What began as a collaboration to explore the impacts of fracking in southwest Pennsylvania last June, has now taken us into the heart of the world’s greatest concentration of oil and gas refining.

Climate Change Survival: Choose Your Own Adventure

We are at a point today where every decision we make counts in deciding what America’s climate change story will be–including the fundamental decision of how we tell climate change stories.

The Social Side of Pest Management

Plans to manage pest species are becoming increasingly larger in scale and ambition. The outcomes of such programmes can have just as important impacts on the resident human communities as the plant and animal communities.

Save Our National Monuments

If Ryan Zinke, the secretary of interior, wants to emulate Theodore Roosevelt’s legacy, he should recommend leaving the national monuments as they are.

I met the tribe on the front line in the battle to save Indonesia’s forests

By Sophie Grig, Survival International campaigner  “We’re proud that we still have the forest,” Temenggung Grip says, standing tall, waving at the vast expanse of trees. “We feel proud to be Orang Rimba, everything we have talked about still exists, people ask about tigers, how big are they, what are they like, and we know…

Get Inspired and Challenged by Native Youth Congress

One thing is clear where Jon and these kids come from in Native America: there’s not much sugar-coating going on. When you ask a hard question in Indian Country, you’ll likely get a harder answer.

Reflections on the March for Science

It’s been three months since the March for Science, when over a million people, in over 600 cities, with almost 300 partner organizations took to the streets to champion science for the common good. It was an incredible day. From the stage at the DC march, I looked out on the crowd – well over…

Environmental Education in an Extractive Economy: Azerbaijan’s IDEA Initiative

Oil and gas economies are often perceived by conservationists to have diminished sensibilities towards the environment. However, the wealth generation in such economies can also create opportunities for conservation, as there is less incentive for excessive land-use and mineral revenues can lead to investments in environmental education. Some earlier research by Sven Wunder on oil…

1Frame4Nature | Amplifying the Big Picture

Over the years I hope I’ve learned a few things. I’ve learned that travelling the globe on short-lived smash and grab photographic raids is great fun but makes little difference to conservation. I’ve learned that conserving wildlife and wild places has very little to do with wildlife and wild places and everything to do with people and their value systems. Combining these two lessons led me to an obvious question a few years back: Where can I work most effectively? Clearly the answer lay close to home.

Military-Civilian Partnership Brings New Oyster Reef to Northwest Florida

The air reverberated with clinking noises and the whoosh of oyster shells sliding off giant piles into waiting buckets. Volunteers, Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance (CBA) staff and their AmeriCorps team gathered the shells in mesh bags, slowly building another mound of new reef material. As they worked, a truck pulled in with even more shells, collected…