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Category archives for Fish

What’s the cost of a surf-and-turf dinner? 1,795 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

What’s the cost of an average shrimp-and-steak dinner? If it comes from the loss of mangrove forests to aquaculture and agriculture, it’s 1,795 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions. That’s about the same amount of greenhouse gases produced by driving a fuel-efficient car from Los Angeles to New York City. Clearcutting of tropical mangrove forests to…

Menhaden, The Little Fish That Could—Won’t

Menhaden, the little fish that could, can’t. I mean, they can but they won’t. Because as of a few days ago, they’re not allowed to. This week they got another bad break from fisheries managers. Let me explain. The fish is called “the most important fish in the sea” because it feeds so many whales,…

Shedd Aquarium Teens and Volunteers Lend an Eye to Global Research

The following is a blog post by Dr. Steve Kessel, director of marine research at Shedd Aquarium. You don’t have to be a scientist to contribute to a global research study thanks to a growing number of projects that rely on citizen science. These are projects in which volunteers and scientists work together to answer real-world…

One Fin, Two Fin, No Fin, Bluefin

By Carl Safina Atlantic Bluefin tuna might be the best studied marine fish in the world. But counting Bluefin in the wild is difficult. They can live several decades and reach 1,500 pounds, and they migrate across the ocean. It’s been particularly difficult for western Atlantic Bluefin. (Eastern Atlantic and western Atlantic tuna are named…

5 Global Trends Open Huge Market Opportunities for Innovation in Seafood

If you’re a talented young data scientist scouting the next frontier, where do you go? If you’re a biotech pioneer hunting for new ways to apply cutting-edge concepts, where do you look? If you’re a global powerhouse that doesn’t want to miss the next big market opportunity, what’s on your radar? Sustainable seafood. Seriously. That…

Under the Full Moon: Tracking Nassau Grouper with Acoustic Telemetry

This blog post was written by Krista Sherman, Research Associate at Shedd Aquarium and Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Exeter. Krista’s research is focused on understanding endangered Nassau grouper populations in The Bahamas. In the winter, under the light of full moon, Nassau grouper, Epinephelus striatus, migrate great distances, often over 300 km, to…

How Fish Are Like Coffee: the Changes Coming to Your Seafood Plate

Over the past five years, as I’ve built the Fish 2.0 business competition, I’ve seen an overwhelming number of creative ideas bubbling up—with highly qualified entrepreneurial teams behind them. Their innovations, combined with powerful social and environmental forces, are creating a new world both above and below the ocean’s surface. I believe that by 2027,…

Cuba – Gardens of the Queen: The Last Stand for Caribbean Reef Systems

Safina Center Fellow Shawn Heinrichs documents a special Caribbean diving experience in Cuba.

Will the Ocean Ever Run Out of Fish?

By Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet   What’s the deal with overfishing? What’s at stake? And what can we do about it? We teamed up with the good folks at TEDEd on this animated short to explain. Punchline: Wild fish simply can’t reproduce as fast as 8 billion people can eat them. So we…

Indestructible Predators or Vulnerable Species: Shark Week at Shedd

While sharks have the reputation of being indestructible, their populations are actually decreasing and some species are endangered or vulnerable to extinction. As apex predators, sharks play an important role in the ecosystem by maintaining populations of lower trophic levels and serving as an indicator for ocean health.  For Shark Week, Shedd Aquarium is raising…

Reflections on the March for Science

It’s been three months since the March for Science, when over a million people, in over 600 cities, with almost 300 partner organizations took to the streets to champion science for the common good. It was an incredible day. From the stage at the DC march, I looked out on the crowd – well over…

Marine Biology at the Top of the World

Svalbard. 78° north. Only 750 miles from the North Pole. We join Knut Sunnanå, chief scientist, and his team aboard the RV Helmar Hanssen for the first few days of a research cruise in the waters around Svalbard.

Underwater photography and film project brings attention to “ghost fishing,” a deadly problem

Documentary filmmaker Christine Ren completes underwater photography and film project to bring attention to deadly issue of ghost fishing.

Sushi Roulette: Is the Fish You Ordered the One You Got?

Have plans this summer to visit your favorite sushi restaurant? You might order spicy tuna roll. Or maybe salmon or halibut. But is the fish you selected the one you got? If you’re in Los Angeles or many other cities around the globe, it’s a flip of the coin. Scientists at Loyola Marymount University, the…

1Frame4Nature | A Vessel of Life in the Philippine Seas

Imagine a booming underwater powerhouse, overflowing with vibrant biodiversity; a vast, dynamic wonderland of adaptation in aquatic form. Primordial soup? Not quite–though coral reefs are themselves an irreplaceable vessel of life. From fish nurseries to coastline protection and pharmaceutical breakthroughs to diving meccas, coral reefs provide a multitude of ecological services and economic contributions. Awed by the endless infinity of life living upon life to degrees unimaginable to the naked eye, I count myself lucky to have spent time in these enchanting habitats in many parts of the world.