VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Category archives for Archaeology

I met the tribe on the front line in the battle to save Indonesia’s forests

By Sophie Grig, Survival International campaigner  “We’re proud that we still have the forest,” Temenggung Grip says, standing tall, waving at the vast expanse of trees. “We feel proud to be Orang Rimba, everything we have talked about still exists, people ask about tigers, how big are they, what are they like, and we know…

St Kilda – Life on a Remote Island

St Kilda is a remote island group in the North Atlantic off the coast of Scotland. Having made it to Scotland, and then the Outer Hebrides, it made sense to hop one more island to what was once the very edge of the world.

Florida Keys Museum Tells Story Of Wrecker’s Paradise

John Jacob Housman’s character was complex and colorful. He was an energetic entrepreneur, a shrewd businessman, a daring adventurer, a visionary developer, and it was all wrapped around the soul of a pirate. And in 1830, he found the perfect place to use these traits to his best advantage—Indian Key, a remote, tropical island in…

So You Want to Fly Drones for Conservation?

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography. In the recent past, drones have exploded into the public eye. A subject of constant controversy, they summon debates about personal privacy, the dynamics of political…

Second Cave Chamber Reveals Spectacular New Homo Naledi Skull and More

New papers published today in ELife shed new light on the age of this mysterious member of our family and reveal that a second chamber contains the remains of at least three more individuals, including the most complete Homo naledi skull yet found.

Long lost story-telling Sioux, Reaching-for-Peace Pipe carrier, comes to light

A remote cabin high in Utah’s Kolob Canyon country above the famous Zion Canyon seems an unlikely place for the “discovery” of an iconic piece of American Indian history. A beaded peace pipe bag has come to light that depicts a soldier holding a rifle with fixed bayonet and a Native American with bow and arrows.  Both…

In Central Asia, a Stone Age Workshop Hints at Humankind’s Obsession With Blades

Journalist-explorer Paul Salopek is walking across the world in the footsteps of our ancestors. He posts this dispatch from Ak-Olon, Kyrgyzstan. We stand in a remote canyon in the mountains of Kyrgyzstan. The canyon debouches onto a pale barren plain once crisscrossed by camel trains. Kubatbek Tabaldyev leans into a wall of black stone. The…

A Rich Petroglyph Site in Central Asia Offers a Lesson in Human Restlessness—and Patience

The drawings represent—what? A question? A plea? Perhaps a prayer?

Ever Dreamed of Being an Archaeologist?

Growing up, I was obsessed with Indiana Jones—and today, I’m lucky enough to be an archaeologist who digs regularly in Egypt. Now, I get to help others live out the dream with GlobalXplorer. Here are some of their stories.

How New Technology Accelerates the Search for Ancient Sites

Using satellite technology and the power of the crowd, I believe we’ll find and protect an incredible number of ancient sites, which could offer new clues into who we are as human beings.

New Excavation Season Begins at Unusual Egyptian/Nubian Site

Will we be fortunate enough to find another undisturbed burial where we can see exactly how a person was laid to rest?

Year-End Honors for Our Cutting-Edge Explorers

2016 has been an incredible year for exploration, research, and conservation—and explorers supported by the National Geographic Society have been at the top of each of those fields.

Re-wilding an Island

Last week I bore witness to the re-wilding of an entire island ecosystem. Invasive mammalian predators were eradicated from Ahuahu (Great Mercury Island) in 2014, and the original predators and keystone species are now returning naturally.

Walking the World, In the Footsteps of Our Restless Forebears

Almost four years ago veteran journalist and National Geographic Fellow Paul Salopek set out from one of the oldest Homo sapiens fossil sites in the world—located in the parched Rift Valley of Ethiopia—to begin crossing the Earth on foot along the pathways of the original human migration out of Africa. To date Salopek has walked…

The Lost History of South Africa

The strange creature is half antelope and half bird. Painted in jet black, frozen in flight on the wall, the animal has the hind legs and tail of a buck, and the magnificent wings of a raven that spread out from its shoulders. Above the flying figure, a long scaly reptile with crocodile-like ridges stretches…