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Category archives for History

Understanding Identity and Kyrgyz Cultural Values Through Food

Food is not just something we eat to enjoy and to give us nourishment; it is also a powerful tool through which we can view and begin to understand other cultures. Every culture brings its own cuisine to the world’s culinary table and each of these dishes tell a story. From the ingredients, we can…

From Our Archive: Rapids Ahead!

In November 1969, the National Geographic Society celebrated the centennial of John Wesley Powell’s expedition down the Colorado River. Powell, one of our founding members, embarked on his 98-day journey on May 24 1869. The purpose of his expedition — “Powell, in a last letter from Green River, explained, ‘The object is to make collections…

Through the Mountain Pass

I’m sitting in a shared taxi en route to Talas, the region to the west of Bishkek. The sun is descending and night is falling. The inside of the taxi is dark – the only light coming from the small screen hanging from the roof playing Russian pop music videos. All I can see outside…

How Nature Is Nurturing Cities

Harini Nagendra has spent more than a decade studying the growth and functioning of cities in South Asia, supported in part by grants from the National Geographic Society in 2006 and 2011. In her new book, Nature in the City: Bengaluru in the Past, Present, and Future she focuses in on the booming modern city of…

A Parable of Refugees, or a History That Is True

I want to take you back nearly 80 years, to Mexico City in 1939, when Lázaro Cárdenas, a revolutionary-turned-politician, sat in the president’s seat and made a decision that no other president in the world would make. Across the Atlantic, the Spanish Civil War had come to a brutal end. The Republicans had fallen. General…

Hōkūleʻa Joins the Centennial Tribute to Queen Liliʻuokalani

In honor of Queen Liliʻuokalani, Hōkūleʻa this morning set sail along the southern shoreline of Oʻahu to join in an observance ceremony shared across the island chain. At around 8:30 am, Hōkūleʻa was faced toward the direction of Iolani Palace, Kawaiahaʻo and Washington Place and her sails were lowered. At this moment, double rainbows appeared…

We Biked 5,000 Miles and Saw an American South Few People Know Exists

We two brothers embarked on an epic ride and found that the lines between left and right and conservative and liberal are often quite contrived, and many of these people have more in common than we could have imagined. We hope that this film can be part of a much needed bridge being built.

‘It Wasn’t a Very Happy Childhood’: Rediscovering the Spanish Children of Morelia

Two years ago, we moved my grandmother. In the span of her lifetime, it was one migration among many. As a child, she had been moved from Spain to Mexico, to flee the Spanish Civil War. In 1937, she was put on a boat, called the Mexique, along with 456 other children: the Niños de Morelia. In 1937,…

Exploring Identity in Kyrgyzstan

To be 26 years old – an age between young adulthood and actual adulthood and a time when many begin to ask themselves questions like “who am I?” “what defines me?” “where am I going?” more frequently. As a 26-year-old, I ask myself these questions everyday, usually 20 times a day before noon, as does…

Fridtjof Nansen: Modern Explorers Retrace His Steps

Modern explorers  Børge Ousland and Thomas Ulrich set to trace the route of Fridtjof Nansen and Hjalmar Johansen. “We came to their wintering hut at Jackson Island, which was a touching and very special moment,” writes Ousland. “Here the two explorers spent the winter in 1895-96 with very little equipment, not really knowing where they were. That they survived is a feat second to none in Arctic history.”

Climate Change Survival: Choose Your Own Adventure

We are at a point today where every decision we make counts in deciding what America’s climate change story will be–including the fundamental decision of how we tell climate change stories.

Get Inspired and Challenged by Native Youth Congress

One thing is clear where Jon and these kids come from in Native America: there’s not much sugar-coating going on. When you ask a hard question in Indian Country, you’ll likely get a harder answer.

The Camargue: Wild West of France

This post is the latest in the series Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About, which profiles marvelous locations, unique life experiences and objects of interest to modern explorers that Kike discovers during my travels. The Camargue region is sometimes known as the “Wild West of France.” Located in the southeast of the country, it is Western Europe’s largest river delta.…

122 Countries Have Moved to Ban Nuclear Weapons. What Happens Next?

  United Nations — For the first time in history, a majority of the world’s nations have crafted a treaty to ban nuclear weapons. Hundreds of NGOs united under the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) to push the majority of the world’s countries at the United Nations to create a legally binding instrument to prohibit…

Florida Keys Museum Tells Story Of Wrecker’s Paradise

John Jacob Housman’s character was complex and colorful. He was an energetic entrepreneur, a shrewd businessman, a daring adventurer, a visionary developer, and it was all wrapped around the soul of a pirate. And in 1830, he found the perfect place to use these traits to his best advantage—Indian Key, a remote, tropical island in…