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Category archives for Oceans

Cuba – Gardens of the Queen: The Last Stand for Caribbean Reef Systems

Safina Center Fellow Shawn Heinrichs documents a special Caribbean diving experience in Cuba.

Will the Ocean Ever Run Out of Fish?

By Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet   What’s the deal with overfishing? What’s at stake? And what can we do about it? We teamed up with the good folks at TEDEd on this animated short to explain. Punchline: Wild fish simply can’t reproduce as fast as 8 billion people can eat them. So we…

An elephant seal enters the world: Capturing a rare and beautiful moment in words and on camera

Wildlife photographer Jodi Frediani captures–in words and on camera–a rare and beautiful moment in nature: the birth of an elephant seal.

Charles Moore is now a two-time Garbage Patch discoverer (and I can tell you what a Garbage Patch looks like)

Last November, Captain Charles Moore would set off to discover a second “Garbage Patch” in the South Pacific as photojournalist Erica Cirino sailed the first patch in the North Pacific he discovered 20 years ago.

Reflections on the March for Science

It’s been three months since the March for Science, when over a million people, in over 600 cities, with almost 300 partner organizations took to the streets to champion science for the common good. It was an incredible day. From the stage at the DC march, I looked out on the crowd – well over…

Marine Biology at the Top of the World

Svalbard. 78° north. Only 750 miles from the North Pole. We join Knut Sunnanå, chief scientist, and his team aboard the RV Helmar Hanssen for the first few days of a research cruise in the waters around Svalbard.

Everglades Restoration: Alterations of Downstream Biodiversity

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by NOAA, the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. Changing Waters At first glance, the waterways within Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (RB NERR) seem pristine. While I kayaked…

122 Countries Have Moved to Ban Nuclear Weapons. What Happens Next?

  United Nations — For the first time in history, a majority of the world’s nations have crafted a treaty to ban nuclear weapons. Hundreds of NGOs united under the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) to push the majority of the world’s countries at the United Nations to create a legally binding instrument to prohibit…

Florida Keys Museum Tells Story Of Wrecker’s Paradise

John Jacob Housman’s character was complex and colorful. He was an energetic entrepreneur, a shrewd businessman, a daring adventurer, a visionary developer, and it was all wrapped around the soul of a pirate. And in 1830, he found the perfect place to use these traits to his best advantage—Indian Key, a remote, tropical island in…

Underwater photography and film project brings attention to “ghost fishing,” a deadly problem

Documentary filmmaker Christine Ren completes underwater photography and film project to bring attention to deadly issue of ghost fishing.

Sushi Roulette: Is the Fish You Ordered the One You Got?

Have plans this summer to visit your favorite sushi restaurant? You might order spicy tuna roll. Or maybe salmon or halibut. But is the fish you selected the one you got? If you’re in Los Angeles or many other cities around the globe, it’s a flip of the coin. Scientists at Loyola Marymount University, the…

Trump makes California’s deadliest catch even more deadly: The driftnet fishery for swordfish and shark off our coast

The Driftnet Fishery for Swordfish and Shark Off Our Coast President Trump has just declared war on whales, dolphins and sea turtles in the Pacific. Right now a deadly driftnet fishery targeting swordfish and shark operates off California’s coast with fatal consequences for marine mammals. Unfortunately the Trump Administration has just made it deadlier by reversing…

1Frame4Nature | A Vessel of Life in the Philippine Seas

Imagine a booming underwater powerhouse, overflowing with vibrant biodiversity; a vast, dynamic wonderland of adaptation in aquatic form. Primordial soup? Not quite–though coral reefs are themselves an irreplaceable vessel of life. From fish nurseries to coastline protection and pharmaceutical breakthroughs to diving meccas, coral reefs provide a multitude of ecological services and economic contributions. Awed by the endless infinity of life living upon life to degrees unimaginable to the naked eye, I count myself lucky to have spent time in these enchanting habitats in many parts of the world.

How the Safina Center is helping to save the seas this World Oceans Day (and every day)

The members of the Safina Center crew send out their World Oceans Day messages and discuss what they’re doing to help save the seas.

The Maiden Expedition of 50 Reefs

Nimrod is a tough man with deeply tanned skin – the result of 40 years of fishing. He is one of the few remaining full-time fishermen in Palau, a beautiful, remote island in the Western Pacific Ocean. His job used to be easy. He could catch a full day’s haul without leaving sight of the jetty,…