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Category archives for Water

Global Handwashing Day: Reflecting on handwashing under the Ethiopian sun  

One hot afternoon last year, there was dancing and singing as a young girl named Nigisti stepped forward to wash her hands. Other students at the Abi Adi School in Trigray, Ethiopia stood in line behind her, grinning widely as they awaited their turn. As Nigisti scrubbed the soap between her fingers, the school’s principal…

Preparing for Floods, Droughts and Water Shortages by Working with, Rather than Against, Nature

Decades ago, Albert Einstein reminded us of a fundamental lesson that’s hard to learn: “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” Fortunately, just when it’s crucially needed, a new mind-set about water is taking shape. It’s one that blends engineering, ecology, economics, and related fields into a more holistic approach that recognizes the fundamental value of nature’s services.

The Cost Of Producing Food In A Warmer, Wetter World

By Eliza Roberts Manager, Water at Ceres Preliminary estimates for the costs of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria are in the hundreds of billions of dollars range—from disruption of business, to infrastructure and property damage, to crop losses. Each of the deadly storms hit agriculture especially hard, from cattle and soy in Texas, to citrus…

5 Global Trends Open Huge Market Opportunities for Innovation in Seafood

If you’re a talented young data scientist scouting the next frontier, where do you go? If you’re a biotech pioneer hunting for new ways to apply cutting-edge concepts, where do you look? If you’re a global powerhouse that doesn’t want to miss the next big market opportunity, what’s on your radar? Sustainable seafood. Seriously. That…

Managing Feral Horse Populations in North Carolina’s Rachel Carson Reserve

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by NOAA, the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. Paula Gillikin starts up the motor, flips the boat into reverse and pulls out of the North Carolina National Estuarine Research…

Making an Impact on Marine Debris through Education

The following is a blog post by Marie Kowalski, Learning Specialist at Shedd Aquarium, about the important role of education in reducing marine debris and plastic pollution.   Take a moment to look around. How many items can you see right now that are made at least partly with plastic? Cell phones, pens, toothbrushes, buttons and…

Reaping What You Sow: The Upside to Conserving Water Even as Your Rates Rise

By Mary Ann Dickinson and Chelsea Hawkins There’s something counter-intuitive about paying more for water even as you use less of it.  If, for example, you used less data than your cell phone plan allowed, you wouldn’t expect your bill to go up.  But the comparison of water to data for your phone service misplaces…

Under the Full Moon: Tracking Nassau Grouper with Acoustic Telemetry

This blog post was written by Krista Sherman, Research Associate at Shedd Aquarium and Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Exeter. Krista’s research is focused on understanding endangered Nassau grouper populations in The Bahamas. In the winter, under the light of full moon, Nassau grouper, Epinephelus striatus, migrate great distances, often over 300 km, to…

Sustainable Urban Water Systems: A View from the Tap

By Anisha Anantapadmanabhan Manager, Water Infrastructure, Ceres As Hurricane Harvey floodwaters recede, and Houston begins the long, expensive road to recovery, its civil engineers and city planners can learn from other cities that are embracing a sustainable water movement. Engineers, planners and financiers are coming together in many cities across the U.S. under a sustainable…

Why the US Clean Water Rule Needs to Stay in Place

We have many lessons to learn from the tragedies wrought by Hurricane Harvey, but among the most important is that a broken water cycle increases risks to our communities and economies. Floodplains, tributaries, wetlands, lakes, ponds, rivers and groundwater form an interconnected whole that helps ensure clean, safe, reliable water supplies.  A well-functioning water cycle…

Lessons Learned by High School Lake Ecology (HSLE) Leaders

Cecily Smith, senior at Grinnell College majoring in Sociology and Chinese with plans to pursue a career in education During high school, I took AP Environmental Science taught by a phenomenal teacher and loved everything I learned, which inspired me to study Environmental Science in college and pursue a career in conservation. When I applied…

The Birth of A Research Project: Desperately Seeking Dolphins

One of the questions I often get from students and lay people interested in dolphins, whales, and the oceans in general, is: “How do you come up with ideas for your research at sea?” Here is an excerpt from my latest book that can help answer this question… Dolphins may do amazing things or nothing…

How Fish Are Like Coffee: the Changes Coming to Your Seafood Plate

Over the past five years, as I’ve built the Fish 2.0 business competition, I’ve seen an overwhelming number of creative ideas bubbling up—with highly qualified entrepreneurial teams behind them. Their innovations, combined with powerful social and environmental forces, are creating a new world both above and below the ocean’s surface. I believe that by 2027,…

California Dairies Join Forces with Conservationists and an Irrigation Supplier to Save Water and Reduce Groundwater Pollution

For most of us, dairy products like milk, butter, cheese, and yogurt are an integral part of our daily diets. In fact, US residents consume on average more than 600 pounds of dairy products (expressed on a milk-equivalent basis) per year, according to the US Department of Agriculture. Some 9 million dairy cows meet that…

Charles Moore is now a two-time Garbage Patch discoverer (and I can tell you what a Garbage Patch looks like)

Last November, Captain Charles Moore would set off to discover a second “Garbage Patch” in the South Pacific as photojournalist Erica Cirino sailed the first patch in the North Pacific he discovered 20 years ago.