VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Category archives for Central America

A Parable of Refugees, or a History That Is True

I want to take you back nearly 80 years, to Mexico City in 1939, when Lázaro Cárdenas, a revolutionary-turned-politician, sat in the president’s seat and made a decision that no other president in the world would make. Across the Atlantic, the Spanish Civil War had come to a brutal end. The Republicans had fallen. General…

Salamander Rediscovery Gets Search for Lost Species Off to Promising Start

By Don Church, Global Wildlife Conservation president Before we even had a chance to launch our first expedition this fall in Global Wildlife Conservation’s Search for Lost Species, we somehow amazingly struck gold in Guatemala. That gold was in the form of the brilliantly yellow-hued Jackson’s Climbing Salamander, a species missing to science since its…

1Frame4Nature | A Vessel of Life in the Philippine Seas

Imagine a booming underwater powerhouse, overflowing with vibrant biodiversity; a vast, dynamic wonderland of adaptation in aquatic form. Primordial soup? Not quite–though coral reefs are themselves an irreplaceable vessel of life. From fish nurseries to coastline protection and pharmaceutical breakthroughs to diving meccas, coral reefs provide a multitude of ecological services and economic contributions. Awed by the endless infinity of life living upon life to degrees unimaginable to the naked eye, I count myself lucky to have spent time in these enchanting habitats in many parts of the world.

Exploring the use of five types of puma vocalizations

Communication is an important component of animal behavior, but is difficult to study in the wild. This is especially true for cryptic wildlife species, such as carnivores, that are difficult to observe. Recent advances in the technology of motion-triggered video cameras now enable researchers to remotely record intimate behaviors, such as vocalizations, in cryptic species.…

One More Threat for the East Pacific Leatherback

By Lauren Hackney Upon arrival for my second field season with The Leatherback Trust in Costa Rica, I was eager to return to Playa Grande for its unique biodiversity. Playa Grande’s pristine white sand beach hosts nesting leatherbacks, the same species who swam our oceans 110 million years ago when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Now…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #80

Hello, and welcome to the 80th edition of “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! Since reviving the blog earlier this year we have been overwhelmed by the influx of incredible photo entries we are receiving on the Facebook page. We are thrilled to see that many of the entries are coming from photographers…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #79

As the majestic masters of sea, land and sky, birds of all kinds have become significant symbols in all our cultures. Many of us celebrate bird diversity every day without even knowing it. Just as every country has a flag, each nation also has a national bird. While it may be less known that the charismatic Common…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #78

The WildBird! Revolution is back in full swing and we are delighted to present the second “Top 25” of 2017! Each of these images is literally just a snapshot of a much greater journey. The photographers who contribute these photos have dedicated so much time, energy, passion and resources into capturing moments that would otherwise go unseen. We can all…

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #77

It has been almost two years since the 76th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”. We have continued the “Wild Birds! Revolution” on our Wild Bird Trust Facebook page. Our mission to share incredible wild bird photography with the world now has 1,1 million followers.  Birds are the colour, song…

Rebounding from Hurricane Otto in Nicaragua’s Most Ecologically Sensitive Rainforests

By Chris Jordan, GWC’s Nicaragua Programs Director (with editorial help from Gerald R. Urquhart, Assistant Professor at Michigan State University) November 24, 2016, is a day I will never forget. While many in the United States were sitting down to enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner, I was hunkered down with my forest patrol team in Nicaragua as…

Getting Stung for Science in the Rain Forest

Today I was stung by a livid South American wasp for the 70th time. But it’ll all be worth it if I can learn what drives the startling social relationships of these amazing insects.

Optimizing Rapid Eradication Assessment

Biological invasions can happen quickly and the best response is a rapidly confirmed eradication. Models combining data on the population dynamics of the invasive species with a given level of monitoring effort allow managers to quantify the probability that eradication has successfully been achieved.

World of Dances #19

This post is the latest in the World of Dances series, which profiles ballet and dance photography in iconic, architectonically unique, culturally emblematic, rapidly vanishing landmarks or simply unexpected locations, that Kike captures about during his travels.      I photographed  Leydi in a remote village next to the Chagres River when she was still dancing for the National Ballet of Panama. The Emberá…

Seeds, Soil and SMS: How Mobiles Promote Resilience Among Small-Scale Farmers in Africa

Despite producing more than 70% of the world’s food, most small-scale farmers live on less than $1 a day. Typically, they lack access to finance, traditional markets and much-needed agricultural products. Not only that, many also live in remote areas without Internet access meaning they have no way to access vital agricultural advice or information, either. In…

Fish Spawning Aggregations: an illusion of plenty

Spawning aggregations are massive gatherings of fish for breeding, a behavior shared by many species across the globe in many different habitats. They are predictable because they usually happen at the same place and at the same time each year, and humans have taken advantage of this to harvest large numbers of fish with minimal effort. But as harvesting keeps growing, fish populations keep diminishing.