VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Category archives for United States

Saying Yes, and…. Smart Siting of Wind and Solar is a Game Changer

By Lynn Scarlett, Co-Chief External Affairs Officer, The Nature Conservancy At the end of the nineteenth century, great minds in America were in furious debate—should we power the future using direct current or alternating current? Nikola Tesla and George Westinghouse favored AC current because it permitted the transmission of electricity over greater distances using thinner…

Downwind: Living in the Shadows of Houston’s Refineries

When a balloon floats towards the sky, two-year old Rosalina Chronister tells her great grandmother, Esperanza, the balloon is visiting her sister, Ciera Rose, in heaven. Ciera Rose was only four when she died of cancer last fall. A few months ago, her family and their friends came together to remember this energetic child. They released balloons, marking her passing.

What’s the cost of a surf-and-turf dinner? 1,795 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

What’s the cost of an average shrimp-and-steak dinner? If it comes from the loss of mangrove forests to aquaculture and agriculture, it’s 1,795 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions. That’s about the same amount of greenhouse gases produced by driving a fuel-efficient car from Los Angeles to New York City. Clearcutting of tropical mangrove forests to…

Adding an Indigenous Perspective to a Global Scientific Effort

In an exciting collaboration to better understand the world’s most complicated watersheds, the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have joined forces to create the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO)—an ambitious effort committed to the continuous study of watershed health around the world. So how cool that they recently invited us…

Hōkūleʻa Joins the Centennial Tribute to Queen Liliʻuokalani

In honor of Queen Liliʻuokalani, Hōkūleʻa this morning set sail along the southern shoreline of Oʻahu to join in an observance ceremony shared across the island chain. At around 8:30 am, Hōkūleʻa was faced toward the direction of Iolani Palace, Kawaiahaʻo and Washington Place and her sails were lowered. At this moment, double rainbows appeared…

We Biked 5,000 Miles and Saw an American South Few People Know Exists

We two brothers embarked on an epic ride and found that the lines between left and right and conservative and liberal are often quite contrived, and many of these people have more in common than we could have imagined. We hope that this film can be part of a much needed bridge being built.

The acquisition of apex carnivore scent by a subordinate carnivore

Apex carnivores are well known for their effects on ecosystems, which include keeping prey populations balanced and limiting the spread of disease. Another important effect apex carnivores have is structuring their ecological communities. For example both prey and smaller carnivores avoid areas and habitats that are frequently used by apex carnivores, which directly affects their…

Celebrating the Original Environmental Stewards

By Erin Myers Madeira and Mary Huffman Columbus Day in the United States has long been known as a celebration of the discovery of the “New World” by the Spanish explorer, and many people across the country take the second Monday of October off from work and school to honor the founding of America. But…

Managing Feral Horse Populations in North Carolina’s Rachel Carson Reserve

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by NOAA, the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. Paula Gillikin starts up the motor, flips the boat into reverse and pulls out of the North Carolina National Estuarine Research…

Fall Color In-Depth: Maple Trees Offer New Answers to Diabetes, Alzheimer’s

In the 1992 film Medicine Man, biochemist Robert Campbell, played by actor Sean Connery, searches for new drugs in the Amazon’s vast rainforests. There Campbell finds a cure for cancer not in the rainforest’s rare flowers – which don’t have “juju,” or the power to heal – but in an indigenous ant species. All is looking…

Sea Turtle “Washbacks” on Florida’s Coastline: What you can do to help

In the days following Hurricane Irma, Florida has slowly started the cleanup process. Roads are cleared off, electricity is slowly making its way back into households, and trees are trimmed up. However, for Florida wildlife, the cleanup process is a little more difficult… and the 2017 Hurricane Season isn’t over just yet. Irma’s Impact on Florida’s…

Climate Change Survival: Choose Your Own Adventure

We are at a point today where every decision we make counts in deciding what America’s climate change story will be–including the fundamental decision of how we tell climate change stories.

Lessons Learned by High School Lake Ecology (HSLE) Leaders

Cecily Smith, senior at Grinnell College majoring in Sociology and Chinese with plans to pursue a career in education During high school, I took AP Environmental Science taught by a phenomenal teacher and loved everything I learned, which inspired me to study Environmental Science in college and pursue a career in conservation. When I applied…

The Beauty and Lessons of a Cloud-Covered Total Eclipse

Many people treat failure as a negative variable best managed, mitigated, or outright avoided. Instead, failure is the dark matter of scientific knowledge—unseen but holding the universe together.

The Birth of A Research Project: Desperately Seeking Dolphins

One of the questions I often get from students and lay people interested in dolphins, whales, and the oceans in general, is: “How do you come up with ideas for your research at sea?” Here is an excerpt from my latest book that can help answer this question… Dolphins may do amazing things or nothing…