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Category archives for Science

Rat Eradication on Ilha do Meio

In Brazil WWF is partnering with TRIADE to undertake a trial rat eradication on Ilha do Meio, one of the small offshore islands of Fernando de Noronha. I visited the island this week so that the team undertaking the project could bring me up to speed on their progress so far.

Fighting tuberculosis with faster, more accurate diagnostics

By Harshini Mukundan Around the world, tuberculosis is making a comeback, owing to the increased incidence of HIV/AIDS and several other factors. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), between 1900 and 2015, the incidence of new TB cases increased nearly 40 percent—from an estimated 7.5 million to 10.4 million. Furthermore, the untreatable drug-resistant strains…

Native Invasives

Like all science, invasion biology depends on clear and strict definitions. The concept of a native invasive species therefore sounds implausible, but is exactly what I have found on Fernando de Noronha.

Amazon Biodiversity Monitoring in Ducke Reserve

Monitoring of biodiversity is a challenge, but visiting Ducke reserve in the Amazon I am able to see one of the gold standards for long-term biodiversity research.

Global Handwashing Day: Reflecting on handwashing under the Ethiopian sun  

One hot afternoon last year, there was dancing and singing as a young girl named Nigisti stepped forward to wash her hands. Other students at the Abi Adi School in Trigray, Ethiopia stood in line behind her, grinning widely as they awaited their turn. As Nigisti scrubbed the soap between her fingers, the school’s principal…

Wildlife on Islands of the Rio Negro

Touring through the Amazon I had the unique opportunity to spend a day visiting the small seasonally flooded islands of the Rio Negro. This dynamic landscape plays a huge role regulating local biodiversity.

Giving To Get: Reciprocity Among Mountain Lions

Please Note: This is the first of two blogs about a research paper published today in Science Advances providing the first evidence of complex social strategies in any solitary carnivore—and showing that mountain lions in particular are more social than previously thought. Part Two will chronicle how territorial males structure social interactions among mountain lions.…

How to Seabird in the Dark

I’m on a clifftop in the dark, on a remote island in New Zealand’s Hauraki Gulf. An inky sea lies below, unfamiliar constellations glitter above, and a bird has just flown straight into my hand. Other pale squeaking shapes are brushing by me and bumping into me. A few minutes ago one smacked me in…

Islands of the Amazon

The Amazon is not typically a place one thinks of as insular, but the Parque Nacional de Anavilhanas in Brazil has over 400 islands in the Rio Negro.

Life & Glaciers

  Life & Glaciers (Patagonia’s Untold Stories)   Its skin is splitting open down its back. Three pairs of lateral attachment points keep its streamlined body glued to the submerged rock. It will use the glacial raging torrent to its advantage. With the last air in its body, it inflates its thorax to free itself from…

Managing Feral Horse Populations in North Carolina’s Rachel Carson Reserve

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by NOAA, the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. Paula Gillikin starts up the motor, flips the boat into reverse and pulls out of the North Carolina National Estuarine Research…

Fall Color In-Depth: Maple Trees Offer New Answers to Diabetes, Alzheimer’s

In the 1992 film Medicine Man, biochemist Robert Campbell, played by actor Sean Connery, searches for new drugs in the Amazon’s vast rainforests. There Campbell finds a cure for cancer not in the rainforest’s rare flowers – which don’t have “juju,” or the power to heal – but in an indigenous ant species. All is looking…

Climate Change Survival: Choose Your Own Adventure

We are at a point today where every decision we make counts in deciding what America’s climate change story will be–including the fundamental decision of how we tell climate change stories.

Origins of a Mysterious Arachnid Revealed

Reconstructing schizomid history in Micronesia led us to tackle the most fundamental questions about these animals, namely, what are they, where did they come from, and when did they arise?

Under the Full Moon: Tracking Nassau Grouper with Acoustic Telemetry

This blog post was written by Krista Sherman, Research Associate at Shedd Aquarium and Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Exeter. Krista’s research is focused on understanding endangered Nassau grouper populations in The Bahamas. In the winter, under the light of full moon, Nassau grouper, Epinephelus striatus, migrate great distances, often over 300 km, to…