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Category archives for Science

Planting a New Shoreline: The Importance of Field Trips in Northwest Florida

It was already hot by the time mid-morning rolled around the Florida Panhandle. Light sparkled off the surface of Joe’s Bayou, reflecting a bright blue sky clear of clouds. My co-workers and I waited at the edge of the water, 12 plastic tubs of soil sitting next to us. It was time to plant a…

Viewing the Solar Eclipse—in 1937

By Melissa Sagen “Like a hungry small boy sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner, an astronomer at a total eclipse of the sun is there to get all he can while he has the chance. The boy is determined to stuff himself with as much turkey as possible while it lasts, and the astronomer is eager…

I met the tribe on the front line in the battle to save Indonesia’s forests

By Sophie Grig, Survival International campaigner  “We’re proud that we still have the forest,” Temenggung Grip says, standing tall, waving at the vast expanse of trees. “We feel proud to be Orang Rimba, everything we have talked about still exists, people ask about tigers, how big are they, what are they like, and we know…

Will the Ocean Ever Run Out of Fish?

By Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet   What’s the deal with overfishing? What’s at stake? And what can we do about it? We teamed up with the good folks at TEDEd on this animated short to explain. Punchline: Wild fish simply can’t reproduce as fast as 8 billion people can eat them. So we…

Let’s Talk About Sex—At the Dawn of Life on Earth

Whether sexual or asexual, reproduction is a necessity for all organisms that want to ensure their genetic material survives after they’ve bitten the dust (or in this case, the wet sand). Half-a-billion-year-old animals are no different.

Going Back 50 Years to Slipper Island

Last summer after visiting Great Mercury Island I had the brief opportunity to visit nearby Slipper Island off the coast of the Coromandel. With only a weekend on the island, I set out to perform a ‘bioblitz’ terrestrial fauna survey.

On Ecotourism in Colombia with Megan Epler Wood

This is the  first post in the Colombia Blog Series by Colombia Photo Expeditions, in which Kike Calvo profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on Colombia related to journalism, ecotourism, science, exploration and photography. Megan Epler Wood is an academic, consultant, and CEO who sees sustainable tourism as a way to grow economies while fostering a healthy…

Indestructible Predators or Vulnerable Species: Shark Week at Shedd

While sharks have the reputation of being indestructible, their populations are actually decreasing and some species are endangered or vulnerable to extinction. As apex predators, sharks play an important role in the ecosystem by maintaining populations of lower trophic levels and serving as an indicator for ocean health.  For Shark Week, Shedd Aquarium is raising…

Using machine-learning to scan the sky

By Spencer Johnson If you watch the night sky for a while, you’ll start to notice changes. Meteors streak by, the International Space Station glides over in silence, an airplane blinks overhead. Among these celestial transients, less noticeable but far more powerful objects called blazars flash on and off, in brilliant gamma-ray outbursts and flashes…

Reflections on the March for Science

It’s been three months since the March for Science, when over a million people, in over 600 cities, with almost 300 partner organizations took to the streets to champion science for the common good. It was an incredible day. From the stage at the DC march, I looked out on the crowd – well over…

What ‘Planet of the Apes’ & Caesar Show Us About Our Own Evolution

“Planet of the Apes” might not be our future, but it really was our past. Actors Andy Serkis and Karin Konoval—and Nat Geo Explorer Lee Berger—reveal how.

St Kilda – Life on a Remote Island

St Kilda is a remote island group in the North Atlantic off the coast of Scotland. Having made it to Scotland, and then the Outer Hebrides, it made sense to hop one more island to what was once the very edge of the world.

Why Kill a Snow Leopard Conservation Ranger? Energy Sprawl and Land-Use Conflict

By Joe Kiesecker, Scientist for Lands Conservation, The Nature Conservancy Note: This is the second article in a series on “energy sprawl,” the conversion of new land for energy production. Read the first installment here. A mysterious and untimely death is not what first comes to mind when I think about wildlife conservation. But the…

Shark Side of the Moon

  The behavior of many animals, including humans, are influenced by the cycle of the moon. For example, many fishes time their reproductive events with the full moon. Together with Chris & Monique Fallows, I have been fortunate enough to study predator-prey interactions between great white sharks and cape fur seals at Seal Island in…

Microplastics in a Macroworld: Water Sampling in Patagonia

Dylan Jones describe his experience backpacking through the spectacular landscape of the future Patagonia National Park and collecting microplastic samples for Adventure Scientists’ Global Microplastics Initiative.